Author Archives: Danielle Marszal

Let Us Give Thanks

Good Day!
 
In a very short time, many families across the country will be celebrating an American tradition, as well as one of my favorite holidays, Thanksgiving.  This is such a wonderful time of year filled with family, friends and delicious food.  It is a time when we take a moment out of our busy lives, give thanks for all that we have and for the people we hold close in our thoughts.  Thanksgiving is about giving thanks for the people and blessings of the past year.  From pre-meal prayers to providing meals to the homeless, the holiday is truly a celebration of praise and thanking.  I made a promise to myself several years ago to say thank you more often, to let people know that they have made a difference in my life and since I can’t do that in person I wanted to send my gratitude through this letter.
 
This year, I want to take a moment to thank you. I want to thank every Stetson student for their leadership, commitment and pride in Stetson University.  Of course, I have not met every student on the Stetson University campus, but the student population is what makes Stetson so special.
 
I am honored to serve Stetson University as the Vice President of Student Affairs and I appreciate all of the students that I have had the opportunity to work with.  However, I have realized that I need to be more diligent in thanking not only the students, but also their families, who have guided and supported these young adults.

Please accept my fond appreciation and thanks for your efforts and achievements on making this community a wonderful place. I hope you have a wonderful holiday season.
 
Sincerely,
 
 
 
Dr. Christopher Kandus-Fisher
Vice President of Student Affairs
Stetson University

 

“Ghouls” for Halloween

Happy-Pumpkin-Halloween-Day-Wallpaper

  1. Watch out for your friends, and don’t be afraid to intervene if a situation appears to be scaring your friend or is frightening you. Agree on a secret “butt in” signal for uncomfortable situations, such as “Ghost” or “Ghoul!”
  2. Keep track of how much potion you are consuming, set a limit before you evaporate, have a sober broomstick handler and don’t let that potion out of your sight.  
  3. Check in with your friends throughout All Hallow’s Eve. Form a buddy system so that no one wanders off alone.
  4. For the safety of yourself and others, don’t wear a costume that includes anything that could be confused with a real weapon.
  5. Put emergency numbers in your cell phone, such as public safety.
  6. If your fiendish friend seems too drunk or is acting abnormally, get them to a safe place immediately.
  7. Do not assume that the mummies, witches, and wizards you meet will look out for your best interests! Know who you are talking to.
  8. Don’t eat too much candy! Okay, so it isn’t a real danger, but it is definitely a precaution to take for Halloween.  Enjoy your sweets, but don’t overload.

What You Need to Know About the Ebola Virus

Extensive media attention has been given to the epidemic called Ebola Virus Disease, or EVD, which has caused significant numbers of deaths in West Africa. The first Ebola case in this epidemic surfaced in late 2013 in Guinea close to borders with Liberia and Sierra Leone, where the epidemic continues.

The disease entered the United States recently when a traveler infected with Ebola arrived in Dallas from West Africa. The patient was admitted to the hospital on September 28 and died on October 8. Two nurses who cared for the deceased patient during the severe part of his illness have been diagnosed with Ebola. All others who were in contact with the patient who had been previously quarantined have been cleared.

We want our students, faculty, staff, parents and community partners to know that Stetson’s emergency management and holistic wellness teams are closely monitoring the recommendations by the nation’s Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). According to health professionals, although many members of the general public in the United States have become anxious, the risk to most Americans who have not traveled to West Africa is almost non-existent. However, public health activities, such as surveillance, patient identification and contact tracing are critical parts of the response to control the spread of disease.

Again, according to health officials, Ebola patients are not contagious until they begin to show symptoms such as fever, headache, weakness, muscle pain, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain or hemorrhage. The number of viral particles in the patient’s body dramatically increases as the patient becomes progressively ill.

According to health officials who advise us, Ebola is much less contagious than measles or influenza. It has NOT been demonstrated to be an airborne virus; it is transmitted through direct contact with the blood, secretions, organs or other bodily fluids of infected people, and with surfaces and materials (e.g. bedding, clothing) contaminated with these fluids.

The overwhelming majority of people who have been infected with Ebola are those who have directly cared for a person who is actively sick with the disease or have handled the body of someone who has died from this illness. For this reason, health care providers who care for Ebola patients are at the greatest risk, along with the family members and close friends of a patient, because they have had direct contact with the patient’s bodily fluids that contain virus particles.

Therefore, let me add this statement, as a reminder: One of the best defenses for many diseases, especially with the flu season now upon us, is frequent hand washing.

I will convey updates as information pertinent to the Stetson community becomes available. I have listed several websites that have additional information for your review and education.

Extensive information can be found at the following websites:

Student Leadership Redefined

Strategies to Capitalize on Your Leadership Skills and Experiences That Will Assist You In Securing Your First Job!

Values Day Presentation

Values Day Presentation

Workforce development conflicts, as it relates to post-secondary institutions ability to adequately prepare students prior to graduation, has become a topic of national conversation. College readiness is the combination of skills, knowledge and habits of the mind that is necessary to fully participate in collegiate level courses. These learned skills will be used to enhance  workforce preparedness. According to the Association of American Colleges and Universities (2013), and a recent study that they conducted regarding employers’ views of student learning in college, employers seek graduates who have broad knowledge and skills that emphasize crosscutting outcomes and are able to think critically and creatively to solve problems. This session will allow students to realize that student leadership is not just something to add to their resume, but allow them to communicate the experiences as valuable skills for the future of the workforce.

Values Day Presentation

Parent College Presentations

Hello Hatter Parents,
It was a pleasure to meet so many of you a couple of weeks ago at FOCUS Orientation. I thought it would be helpful for new and returning parents to review the presentations that were given during Parent College. I hope the information serves you well as you continue to navigate the post-secondary experience with your student. Go Hatters!

Please click below to view the presentations

Families as Career Coaches

How Involved is Too Involved