All posts by browncenter

Grading Open House Featuring Chair Massages for Faculty!!

Grading got you down? Looking for some company ?

The Brown Center is hosting a grading open house on Wednesday, May 8th. We will have plenty of coffee on hand, some snacks.

AND Bodhi+Sol is offering free chair massages from 10:00-2:00pm in honor of teacher appreciation week!!

Space is limited, so please help us plan by letting us know when you plan to come, by completing this simple RSVP.

Save-THE-DATE: Faculty Resource Network 2019 NAtional Symposium

Conversation has always been at the core of education, with discussion-based seminars serving as a key paradigm for learning in college. This symposium examines the essential role of the Academy in cultivating meaningful conversations on campus and in the classroom. During this two-day symposium, which contains keynote presentations, panel discussions, and breakout sessions, we encourage you to engage in your own conversations about these important issues. [learn more]

Registration Deadline: November 8, 2019
Hotel Reservation Deadline: October 21, 2019
Participation in the National Symposium is free of charge for Stetson University faculty members and staff.

Stetson Spotlight Series Presents: Dengke Chen

The 2018-19 Stetson Spotlight Series continues on April 26 with a presentation by Dr. Dengke Chen, Assistant Professor of Digital Arts, who will speak on “A Comparative Study and Virtual Representation of Construction Technique and Traditional Carpentry of Dong and Han’s wooden Architecture.

Date: Friday, April 26
Time: 1:30 pm- 2:30 pm
Location: Lynn Business Center 124
Snacks will be available. All are welcome!

SPOTLIGHT NOW OFFERS CULTURAL CREDIT!
Please encourage your students to attend.

Click here for a complete schedule of Stetson’s Spotlight Series.

A Comparative Study and Virtual Representation of Construction Technique and Traditional Carpentry of Dong and Han’s wooden Architecture

As one of the minority groups primarily located in the mountains of southern China, Dong people are famous for their unique carpentry skills and traditional construction techniques. By the impact of urbanization and lacks of succession to the young generation, these skills are endangered. My project attempts the preservation of the rare cultural heritage by analyzing and virtual representing Dong’s carpentry skills and construction techniques through interdisciplinary design.

Dengke Chen holds an M.F.A. in new media from the Pennsylvania State University and a B.F.A. in animation from the China Central Academy of Fine Arts. He comes to Stetson from the Pennsylvania State University, where he taught as an adjunct professor and an instructor.

Chen specializes in 3D animation and digital video. As a graduate research assistant, he created animations to describe a balanced approach to integrating environmental, economic, sociological and aesthetic dimensions of landscape through strategic research and design. He has worked on numerous commercial projects and also as an art director for a popular children’s TV show for China Central Television. With a strong art background and professional experience, he explores the magical world of storytelling in his work, which can be new media, 2D or 3D animation, digital painting and comic art.

Stetson Spotlight Series

The Stetson Spotlight Series at Stetson University is a showcase of faculty research, creative inquiry, and other scholarly engagement to the campus community. Presenters are primarily recipients of grant awards through the Stetson Summer Grant Program.

Click here for a complete schedule of the Stetson Spotlight Series.

Stetson Researcher Discovers Plethora of Parasites Infecting Pygmy Rattlesnakes – Stetson Today

[This story was reprinted in its entirety from Stetson Today]

The Burmese python is one of the largest snakes in the world and a native of southeast Asia. For more than 15 years, the gigantic snake has decimated species and become the ruling reptile in the Florida Everglades.

Prior research by Melissa Miller, Ph.D., interagency python management coordinator of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, and her colleagues found that in addition to eating many birds and mammals, the Burmese python problem has reached a new level of worrisome concern because it carries a parasite that infects native snakes in south Florida.

(Left to right) Biology junior Jenna Palmisano, Ryan McCleary, Ph.D., Brown visiting teacher-scholar fellow in biology, and biology senior Maddy Wheeler conduct a lung flush to obtain a parasite egg sample from the lung of an anesthetized pygmy rattlesnake. The lung flush determines if the snakes have mature parasites in the lungs. Photos/Terence Farrell, Ph.D.

A new study, “Spillover of Pentastome Parasites from Invasive Burmese Pythons to Pygmy Rattlesnakes, Extending Parasite Range in Florida, USA,” is based on research by Terence Farrell, Ph.D., professor of biology at Stetson University; Joseph Agugliaro, Ph.D., assistant professor of biology at Fairleigh Dickinson University; Heather Stockdale Walden, Ph.D., assistant professor of parasitology at the University of Florida; Jim Wellehan, Ph.D., associate professor of zoological medicine and microbiology at the University of Florida; April Childress, lab manager at the University of Florida; and Craig Lind, Ph.D., assistant professor of biology at Stockton University.

The research findings published in the Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles’ journal Herpetological Review suggest that pentastome parasites or worms, are the likely culprit behind the deaths of three pygmy rattlesnakes at Lake Woodruff National Wildlife Refuge in DeLeon Springs, Florida. Pygmy rattlesnakes are venomous snakes native to the southeastern United States.

The research was funded by the Brown Center for Faculty Innovation and Excellence at Stetson University and a research and professional development grant from Stockton University.

Last August, Farrell and Stetson’s former Brown visiting teacher-scholar fellow in biology Lind, found one of the pygmy rattlesnakes they were studying dead with parasitic worms crawling out of its mouth.

A dead pygmy rattlesnake is shown with parasitic worms crawling out of its mouth.

“Dr. Lind and I have been studying pygmy rattlesnakes for decades and found this occurrence pretty alarming,” said Farrell. “We conducted research and found that these types of parasites have never been found in pygmy rattlesnakes before.”

Stetson’s biology faculty and students conducted the preliminary testing, including examining and dissecting the three pygmy rattlesnakes, and found the parasites in the lung and trachea areas, and was consistent with past parasite research findings. These parasites typically reside in the lungs of reptiles that become infected after eating contaminated prey.

The Stetson team collaborated with professors and a lab manager at the College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Florida who administered a polymerase chain reaction test, which provides researchers with additional DNA and a better way to identify pentastome parasite species. The DNA sequences of the parasites found in the pygmy rattlesnakes were consistent with the parasite species from southeast Asia, which are normally found in Burmese pythons.

Farrell and his team of researchers have found the parasites in Central Florida, which is more than 100 miles away from where the Burmese pythons reside in the southern portion of the state.

“Our research shows that the parasites are moving north rapidly along the peninsula and appear to have some major health effects on pygmy rattlesnakes,” said Farrell, who was the paper’s senior research author.

Terence Farrell, Ph.D.,

Burmese pythons evolved in Asia with these parasites, but it’s a new problem for pygmy rattlesnakes and other Florida snakes.

“The parasites that were found in the pygmy rattlesnakes were larger than the ones found in Burmese pythons,” said Farrell. “It’s a nasty situation because the pygmy rattlesnakes haven’t evolved or developed defenses against the parasite.”

Stetson’s biology students are obtaining hands-on experience and conducting cutting-edge research about this new snake epidemic. The study will provide them with the tools they need for their science career.

“I have never worked with snakes before this project, so it has given me a greater understanding and appreciation,” said biology senior Maddy Wheeler. “In the future, I plan to get involved with conducting research on biological and environmental factors that may affect native species and ecosystems as a whole, so this study provided me with research that was geared towards conservation.”

The parasite phenomenon is a reason to worry.

“The research tells us that there’s a whole new concern about invasive species and the diseases and parasites that they bring with them,” said Farrell. “This parasite isn’t just a Florida problem. We have no idea how much of the U.S. this parasite will spread and move into, which may cause it to become a nationwide problem in a few years.”

-Sandra Carr

Source: Stetson Researcher Discovers Plethora of Parasites Infecting Pygmy Rattlesnakes – Stetson Today

Stetson Cardiac Cell Scientist Receives Funding – Stetson Today

[This story was reprinted in its entirety from Stetson Today

Heather Evans-Anderson, Ph.D., assistant professor of health sciences at Stetson University, is the recipient of a PALM Network fellowship and the 2019 Willa Dean Lowery grant. She will use the funds, totaling $13,000, to create a student-centered, technology-rich and active-learning classroom for her anatomy and physiology classes and further her research on communication between cardiac cells during the early stages of heart development using CRISPR technology. The funding also provides an opportunity to present her research at national conferences.

“Applying for funding requires persistence,” said Evans-Anderson. “These funds also will provide a great opportunity to conduct cutting-edge research that I would not otherwise be able to do. I apply for as many opportunities as I can in order to expand possibilities for my students.”

The research process includes traveling to conferences and meetings to present and share research findings with field colleagues and experts. Travel and research expenses can add up, but funding from fellowships and grants can provide a researcher with financial support.

“Attending scientific meetings provides invaluable networking opportunities,” said Evans-Anderson. “In addition, the reagents that I need for conducting CRISPR studies, particularly the genomic sequencing, are very expensive. I wouldn’t be able to do these things or provide such exciting opportunities for my students without these funds.”

Heather Evans-Anderson, Ph.D.

The PALM Network is a national group of dedicated teachers who are committed to active teaching and learning in life science education and STEM classrooms. The fellowship, which is funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) Research Coordination Networks, provides funding to support training in order to promote use of evidence-based, active-learning strategies in teaching.

The organization also provides a chance for fellows and mentors to collaborate on specific goals as well as participate in journal clubs to discuss teaching strategies that promote learning.

“The PALM Network program will provide me with an opportunity to grow as an educator by promoting my ability to conduct active-learning strategies in my classroom to enhance student engagement,” said Evans-Anderson. “Strategies, such as, peer collaboration and encouraging in-class participation will help students connect with and gain more from the course content. I also will be assessing my students’ learning success by comparing test results before and after implementing active-learning assignments and obtaining feedback from students.”

Evans-Anderson will be working with an expert on the science of learning. Her mentor, Mari K. Hopper, Ph.D., is the associate dean of biomedical sciences at Sam Houston State University’s College of Osteopathic Medicine in Huntsville, Texas, has published several papers on active learning. Evans-Anderson will be presenting preliminary data from the pedagogical research that has been conducted as a result of The PALM Network program during the Human Anatomy & Physiology Society conference in Portland, Oregon in May.

“Being a part of The PALM Network fellowship program allows me to be a part of an elite group of dedicated teachers whose mission is to improve student learning,” said Evans-Anderson. “I am very proud to be part of this organization and look forward to the exciting opportunities it will bring.”

The Willa Dean Lowery grant will provide Evans-Anderson with an opportunity to further her research using CRISPR technology, which allows a user to cut and replace DNA sections to edit genes in a living organism. Evans-Anderson and her students will use CRISPR to study endothelial and cardiomyocyte cell interactions by genetically modifying an invertebrate organism to investigate the regulatory mechanisms of heart development. CRISPR stands for Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats.

“Once my students and I successfully edit genes using CRISPR, we will then use next-generation sequencing to examine the entire genome of our mutants in order to determine the overall impact of target-gene editing,” explained Evans-Anderson. “This information will provide significant insight into how the selected target genes impact heart development as well as provide potential new targets to examine.”

Evans-Anderson collaborated with Lynn Kee, Ph.D., assistant professor of biology at Stetson, and her advanced genetics class students for preliminary work required for the Willa Dean Lowery grant. The students will be presenting their work during the Stetson Showcase on Tuesday, April 16.

Evans-Anderson sees great potential with using CRISPR technology as an educational tool and will present her classroom work with CRISPR during the annual American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Experimental Biology meeting in Orlando on Sunday, April 7.

Students also will have an opportunity to present preliminary research findings during the annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students and American Society for Cell Biology conference next fall as well as the National Conference on Undergraduate Research, the Stetson Showcase and Florida Statewide Undergraduate Research Conference in spring 2020.

The project’s preliminary data will be used for additional grant applications. Evans-Anderson — who says she wants to take students to conferences and meetings to “show them the exciting world of research by interacting with renowned scientists in the field” — expects that she and her students will publish scientific research papers in academic journals.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women and an estimated 610,000 people die in the United States each year. The research findings may provide important clues that could support new treatments for preventing and treating cardiovascular conditions.

“Understanding how different genes work together to build the heart can help create new therapies for addressing cardiac defects and disease,” said Evans-Anderson.

-Sandra Carr

Source: Stetson Cardiac Cell Scientist Receives Funding – Stetson Today

The Colloquium is just around the Corner – register now!

Download the schedule-at-a-glance for the 2019 Colloquium on Teaching and Learning Innovation on the DeLand campus, a week from Friday (April 5)

Highlights include …

  • A thought-provoking keynote delivered by Stetson University’s own Community Education Project faculty co-leaders.
  • A dynamic set of concurrent sessions and workshops
  • Free breakfast and lunch
  • A closing reception complete with an immersive art installation, Breathe the Machine
  • A day of conversations about teaching, learning and other aspects of university work with colleagues from across the state.

If you plan to attend any part of the day, please register at this link: https://stetson.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_6JZsVhbAiDlGW0Z
Registration deadline: Mar 31, 2019

CORRECTION: Stetson Spotlight Rescheduled

PLEASE NOTE that due to scheduling conflicts Dr. Daniil Zavlunov’s spotlight presentation has been rescheduled for April 12th.

[click here to add this event to your calendar]


The 2018-19 Stetson Spotlight Series continues on April 12 with a presentation by Dr. Daniil Zavlunov, Assistant Professor of Music History, who will speak on “The Afterlife of Tselontnyä-Analiz (Holistic Analysis): Topic Theory in Soviet Musicology”.

Date: Friday, April 12
Time: 1:30 pm- 2:30 pm
Location: Lynn Business Center 124
Snacks will be available. All are welcome!

SPOTLIGHT NOW OFFERS CULTURAL CREDIT!
Please encourage your students to attend.

Click here for a complete schedule of Stetson’s Spotlight Series.

The Afterlife of Tselontnyä-Analiz (Holistic Analysis): Topic Theory in Soviet Musicology

During the 1930s, Soviet music scholars were intent on developing a “Marxist theory of music.” One of the most significant manifestations of that search was the creation of a new analytical method called “tselostnïy analiz” (holistic analysis), which aimed to consider musical structure, content, and context symbiotically. More radically, holistic analysis itself was an attempt to define and legitimize the discipline of music analysis as a “scientific” endeavor and an independent branch of Soviet musicology. One of the distinctive trademarks of holistic analysis was its direct interest in engaging with music’s signifying potential, which engendered a blossoming of musical semiotics, and, specifically, of—what in the West today is known as—“topic theory.” Topics are musical “signs,” commonplaces, or conventions, which are capable of extra-musical signification. They are elements of musical discourse, furnishing one possible access to meaning in music. Significantly, Soviet topic theory predates that in the West by some decades. My Spotlight talk explores the philosophy behind and ideology of holistic analysis, and then considers one of the analytical system’s most important contributions.

Daniil Zavlunov is a musicologist specializing in nineteenth-century music, with a particular emphasis on the Russian and Italian operatic traditions. Over the last decade, his research has focused on the works and world of Mikhail Glinka. At present, Dr. Zavlunov is writing a cultural history of opera in Russia during the reign of Nicholas I (1825-1855), which draws heavily on new archival sources.

His other scholarly interests include 17th- and 18th-century music, Soviet music and intellectual thought about music, theories of musical form, and music analysis. Some of his research has appeared in The Journal of Musicology and Music Theory Online. In recent years, he has held visiting appointments – teaching music history and theory – at Princeton University, Dartmouth, Skidmore and Haverford Colleges.

At Stetson, Dr. Zavlunov teaches a wide variety of courses in the School of Music, the Department of Creative Arts and the Program in Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies. In addition to his pedagogical and scholarly pursuits, he is also an avid harpsichordist.

Stetson Spotlight Series

The Stetson Spotlight Series at Stetson University is a showcase of faculty research, creative inquiry, and other scholarly engagement to the campus community. Presenters are primarily recipients of grant awards through the Stetson Summer Grant Program.

Click here for a complete schedule of the Stetson Spotlight Series.

Stetson Spotlight Series Presents: Daniil Zavlunov

The 2018-19 Stetson Spotlight Series continues on April 12 with a presentation by Dr. Daniil Zavlunov, Assistant Professor of Music History, who will speak on “The Afterlife of Tselontnyä-Analiz (Holistic Analysis): Topic Theory in Soviet Musicology”.

Date: Friday, April 12
Time: 1:30 pm- 2:30 pm
Location: Lynn Business Center 124
Snacks will be available. All are welcome!

SPOTLIGHT NOW OFFERS CULTURAL CREDIT!
Please encourage your students to attend.

Click here for a complete schedule of Stetson’s Spotlight Series.

The Afterlife of Tselontnyä-Analiz (Holistic Analysis): Topic Theory in Soviet Musicology

During the 1930s, Soviet music scholars were intent on developing a “Marxist theory of music.” One of the most significant manifestations of that search was the creation of a new analytical method called “tselostnïy analiz” (holistic analysis), which aimed to consider musical structure, content, and context symbiotically. More radically, holistic analysis itself was an attempt to define and legitimize the discipline of music analysis as a “scientific” endeavor and an independent branch of Soviet musicology. One of the distinctive trademarks of holistic analysis was its direct interest in engaging with music’s signifying potential, which engendered a blossoming of musical semiotics, and, specifically, of—what in the West today is known as—“topic theory.” Topics are musical “signs,” commonplaces, or conventions, which are capable of extra-musical signification. They are elements of musical discourse, furnishing one possible access to meaning in music. Significantly, Soviet topic theory predates that in the West by some decades. My Spotlight talk explores the philosophy behind and ideology of holistic analysis, and then considers one of the analytical system’s most important contributions.

Daniil Zavlunov is a musicologist specializing in nineteenth-century music, with a particular emphasis on the Russian and Italian operatic traditions. Over the last decade, his research has focused on the works and world of Mikhail Glinka. At present, Dr. Zavlunov is writing a cultural history of opera in Russia during the reign of Nicholas I (1825-1855), which draws heavily on new archival sources.

His other scholarly interests include 17th- and 18th-century music, Soviet music and intellectual thought about music, theories of musical form, and music analysis. Some of his research has appeared in The Journal of Musicology and Music Theory Online. In recent years, he has held visiting appointments – teaching music history and theory – at Princeton University, Dartmouth, Skidmore and Haverford Colleges.

At Stetson, Dr. Zavlunov teaches a wide variety of courses in the School of Music, the Department of Creative Arts and the Program in Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies. In addition to his pedagogical and scholarly pursuits, he is also an avid harpsichordist.

Stetson Spotlight Series

The Stetson Spotlight Series at Stetson University is a showcase of faculty research, creative inquiry, and other scholarly engagement to the campus community. Presenters are primarily recipients of grant awards through the Stetson Summer Grant Program.

Click here for a complete schedule of the Stetson Spotlight Series.

National Women’s History Month

Happy International Women’s Month! As we enter March, be on the look out for events around Stetson University’s campus that helps support and empower women. To learn more about International Women’s Day and this year’s theme, please visit the campaign’s site.

Please show your support (and have fun while doing it) by coming out to these events or donating! See the calendar below.

National Organization for Women – Menstrual Hygiene Drive

March 11th – 13th  | 11a.m.-2p.m. | Carlton Union Building Front Steps

Wine, Women, and Chocolate

March 15th  | 5-9 p.m. | Downtown DeLand

Sullivan Spring Poetry Reading (MFA)

March 14th  | 6-9 p.m. | Rinker Welcome Center – Lynn Presentation Room

So You think You Can Drag

March 15th  | 7-10 p.m. | Allen Hall

Stetson Faculty Women’s Spotlight: Deborah Goldring

March 15th  | 1:30-2:30 p.m. | Lynn Business Center 124

Feminism in the 21st Century – Speaker Christina Hoff Summors

March 19th  | 8-9:30 p.m. | Rinker Welcome Center – Lynn Presentation Room

Teaching Tolerance Workshop

March 22nd | 9 a.m. – 12 p.m. | Davis Hall 205

National Organization for Women at College of Law – Women’s Empowerment Panel

April 2nd  | 6-7:30 p.m. | Mann Lounge

Feminist Beauty Pageant

April 18th  | 6-7 p.m. | Carlton Union Building Garage

Stetson Spotlight Presents: Deborah Goldring

The 2018-19 Stetson Spotlight Series continues on March 15 with a presentation by Dr. Deborah Goldring, Associate Professor of Marketing, who will speak on “Corporate Rebranding: Understanding Managerial Motivations via Controlled Messaging”.

Date: Friday, March 15
Time: 1:30 pm- 2:30 pm
Location: Lynn Business Center 124
Snacks will be available. All are welcome!

SPOTLIGHT NOW OFFERS CULTURAL CREDIT!
Please encourage your students to attend.

Click here for a complete schedule of Stetson’s Spotlight Series.

“Corporate Rebranding: Understanding Managerial Motivations via Controlled Messaging

Companies are under constant pressure to maintain customer authenticity and face unrelenting competition in the market from other brands who strive to gain consumers’ attention. A brand’s corporate name can break through the visual clutter and noise to create an up-to-date brand identity. While in the past, companies may have preserved the same brand name for years or even decades, now companies regularly renew their brand names. The balance between refreshing the brand and maintaining the existing brand is of critical strategic importance. Prior research has focused on theoretical frameworks for corporate rebranding that go beyond mere administrative necessity; however, there is an opportunity to empirically explore the internal managerial conditions that provoke corporate rebranding. This research, in its early stages of development, examines the antecedents of corporate rebranding efforts.

Deborah Goldring is an assistant professor of marketing in the School of Business Administration at Stetson University. She teaches both undergraduate and graduate courses in marketing. She has more than 20 years of leadership experience as a marketing executive with small- and medium-sized businesses in industries including healthcare, manufacturing, technology and professional services. Dr. Goldring earned her Ph.D. in marketing from Florida Atlantic University.

Stetson Spotlight Series

The Stetson Spotlight Series at Stetson University is a showcase of faculty research, creative inquiry, and other scholarly engagement to the campus community. Presenters are primarily recipients of grant awards through the Stetson Summer Grant Program.

Click here for a complete schedule of the Stetson Spotlight Series.