All posts by browncenter

A message on Ramadan

We have received the following information from WORLD to pass on to as many faculty members as possible:

The Islamic holy month of Ramadan began last Thursday, April 23. This means that our Muslim students will be fasting for the duration of the approaching finals season (Friday, May 1-Saturday, May 2 and Monday, May 4-Tuesday, May 5). The Office of Religious and Spiritual Life and WORLD: The David and Leighan Rinker Center for International Learning would like to share how to best support Muslim students during this time:

· A day in the life of a fasting student can involve fasting with no food or drink from 4:30am-8pm, and waking before this time for a pre-dawn meal. Sunset (around 8pm) is a time for prayer and the breaking of the fast, followed by evening prayers.

· After fasting all day, the late afternoon can be a difficult time for students. Students may request to move an exam to an earlier time in the day to circumvent this challenge. Please consider making reasonable allowances for accommodations, given the struggle of a changed schedule and eating habits.

For assistance with accommodation requests or any further questions, contact:
Lindsey Carelli, Office of Religious and Spiritual Life, lcarelli@stetson.edu (x27403) or
Roxanne Lewis, WORLD, rlewis1@stetson.edu (x28165)

COVID-19 mini-grant wrap up 

The Brown Center would like to thank everyone who has participated with our recent COVID-19 mini-grant initiative, which is now closedAs always, we strive to support faculty as leaders and innovators. We recognized that this pandemic was going to be a challenging time for everyone involved and were so happy for the opportunity to help so many of you innovate out of necessity as you transitioned your classes to online deliver 

The money for these COVID-19 mini-grants came after the cancellation of a few projects due to COVID-19including our annual Colloquium, and money we saved on programming earlier in the academic calendar. We decided to rapidly repurpose these funds into this initiative 

The Brown Center provided mini-grants to just over 60 faculty members, with the average mini-grant amount about $92. Overall, we were able to provide funds for 26 microphones & headsets, 12 webcams, 17 hardware products such as cables and tripods, and 13 other software and subscriptions 

Going forward, in order to support our mission, the Brown Center will be focused on providing all fulltime and parttime faculty with individual attention as needed. While we have moved to remote work from our respective homes, please do not hesitate to reach out to our Interim Director Nathan Wolek or our Program Manager Chris Griffin for any help. 

Program Manager: Chris Griffin (cggriffi@stetson.edu) | 386.822.7485 

Interim Director: Nathan Wolek (nwolek@stetson.edu) | 386.822.8987 

Brown Center Office Update

We recognize that the online transition due to the COVID-19 pandemic can be hard on our faculty and staff. In order to uphold our values and assist our faculty during this unprecedented situation, the staff at the Brown Center will focus on providing all full-time and part-time faculty with individual attention as needed. Members of the teaching faculty can call or email the program manager or interim director directly with their specific needs, and we will strive to either address needs ourselves or connect them with the proper office on campus.

Program Manager: Chris Griffin (cggriffi@stetson.edu) | 386.822.7485

Interim Director: Nathan Wolek (nwolek@stetson.edu) | 386.822.8987

Faculty Spotlight #8 March 12th

The Brown Center invites you to our Faculty Spotlight on Thursday, March 12th  at 4:00 PM in the Carlton Union Building’s Faculty Lounge. The spotlights series is a showcase of research, creative inquiry, and other scholarly engagement of the campus community. Stop by and learn about the research of our talented Stetson community! 

For our final Spotlight session, we have invited professors to present their research in the fashion of a Poster Presentation. We invite you to enjoy our faculty’s posters with some wine and cheese!

UPDATE: Given the current concerns about disease transmission, we have cancelled the food and beverages for this event. Sorry for the inconvenience.

Details about the time and place can be found on Stetson’s Event Calendar

The professors displaying their posters are:

Dr. Heather Evans Anderson Assistant Professor of Health Sciences

Department of Health Sciences
To poll or not to poll?  Assessing the impact of interactive polling versus group discussion on student engagement and learning

Debbi Dinkins Associate Dean of the duPont-Ball Library

duPont-Ball Library
If You Have a Garden and a Library : Developing a Library Sensory Garden to Appeal to Neuro-diverse Students

Dr. Cynthia Bennington Professor of Biology

Department of Biology
The Volusia Sandhill Ecosystem

Dr. Sarah Garcia Assistant Professor of Psychology

Department of Psychology
tDCS as a Treatment for Anxiety and Related Cognitive Deficits

Faculty Spotlight #7 February 27th

The Brown Center invites you to our Faculty Spotlight on Thursday, February 27th at 4:00 PM in the Carlton Union Building’s Lee Garage. The spotlights series is a showcase of research, creative inquiry, and other scholarly engagement of the campus community. Stop by and learn about the research of our talented Stetson community!

Details about the time and place can be found on Stetson’s Event Calendar

We have changed the format this year and will be having two sessions for thirty minutes each.

The two professors participating in this spotlight are:

Dr. Su Young Choi Assistant Professor of Communication and Media Studies

Department of Communication and Media Studies

Authoritarian Communication, Peripheralization, and the Politics of Environmental Hazard

The idea of peripheralization highlights the disadvantaged conditions of marginalized communities (e.g., economic marginality, powerlessness, etc.) as the structural source of the phenomenon that environmentally risky infrastructure tends to be sited in these communities, reinforcing already existing socio-environmental inequality. I propose to regard authoritarian communication as a mechanism of materializing peripheralization at the interactive, relational, and micro-levels. Composed of unidirectional projection, partial absorption, and forceful suppression, authoritarian communication situates local, corporate, and government actors in a way that exploits the impoverished conditions of a marginalized community, subordinates its communal capacity, maintains or even expands peripheralization, and hinders environmental democracy. In this talk I illustrate the concrete dynamics of expanding peripheralization by ethnographically analyzing the local protest of Miryang against the Korean Electric Power Corporation’s construction of a 765,000-volt transmission line connected to accumulative nuclear power plants.

Dr. Su Young Choi is an assistant professor of communication and media studies at Stetson University. She examines media and communication in the context of social movement by employing qualitative methods like ethnography, in-depth interviews, and textual and discourse analysis. She is interested in understanding the relationship between cultural transformation and socio-environmental inequality and injustice. She is currently engaging research project about the emergence of youth-led vegan movement in the context of East Asia.


Dr. Katya Kudryavtseva – Assistant Professor of Art History

Department of Art

The Afterlife of Kazimir Malevich’s Suprematism

My sabbatical research addresses the mechanisms of Malevich’s inclusion into the art history canon, demonstrating that the process of reputation-formation depends on the motivated forces responsible for the canon production, which are impacted by a myriad of factors, such as aesthetic preferences and political positions of art institutions’ agents, art market pressures, and contemporary relevance. My talk will focus on one peculiar aspect of establishing Malevich’s legacy, explaining how the Soviet policies governing the display, exchange, and reproduction of Malevich’s works were impacted by the artist’s rise to the prominence in the West in the 1970s. Indeed, the situation was quite paradoxical: on one hand, Malevich was officially criticized for his bourgeois decadence and his works were removed from public display in the USSR, yet, on the other hand, the Soviet museums were carefully studying the current research and market trends involving this type of art. I will highlight the clever and creative strategies used by the Soviet museums that allowed them to negotiate between the strict governmental restrictions on loaning the works to the Western institutions and their need to maintain professional relationships with these institutions.

Dr. Katya Kudryavtseva specializes in art of the twentieth century with a focus on the intersecting trajectories of art history, politics, art institutions and business and their role in the development of the canon of modern and contemporary art. Her book (under contract with NLO, Moscow), “The Making of Kazimir Malevich’s Black Square,” analyzes the artistic practice of a major figure of modernism, Russian painter Kazimir Malevich (1879-1935), through the metamorphosis of his seminal painting, the Black Square (from the easel painting to a revolutionary emblem, to a signature, and, finally, to a commodity). The book provides detailed analysis of both the artist’s changing attitudes towards politics, revolution and authority, and the way suprematism was reinvested with different meanings and adapted to ideological purposes first by the artist himself, his students, and subsequently by scholars, collectors, dealers and art institutions.

Brown Center Poster Presentations

As you know, we’ve been hosting faculty spotlight presentations using a different formula from previous years. We’ve also decided to add the opportunity for poster presentations!
This poster style Spotlight will take place on Thursday, March 12th from 4:00-5:15. We would provide a small stipend for printing ($50). If you are interested in taking part in these poster presentations, please email the title and abstract of your poster presentation to the Brown Center and Chris Griffin by February 28th, so we have time to properly promote this event.
In our promotions, we plan to use your biography, and headshot from your faculty profile. If you would rather see us use something different, please include that in your email.

New Faculty On The Move

Over this past week, our newest Faculty cohort have done some awesome things around campus and we want to highlight them!

This past Sunday (2/9/20), Dr. Jaime Clark performed her Faculty Recital through the School of Music! If you want to check out the beautiful sound of her Cello, click here to watch the recorded live stream.

Yesterday (2/12/20), Dr. Martin Blackwell presented a lecture on the History of Kyiv post Nazi Occupation, the resettlement of this city, and the return of Soviet Power.

In the Hand Art Center, you can find some new exhibits from new faculty! Dr. Madison Creech’s Garniture displays the use of content aware technology creating colors and shapes through snapshots of the Oscar Bluemner collection. This exhibit will be available to view through March 28th. Luca Molnar will be curating Over Yonder, a video art show displaying 10 southern artists and how their landscapes highlight the way industry, gender, race, history, and violence shaped the South today. Katie Baczeski will also be curating the Clay Legacies exhibit, which highlights three generations of ceramics and art pieces from Stetson’s permanent collection. This exhibit will feature work from previously visiting professors, retired professors, current professors, and students. These will be available for viewing from February 17th (Monday!) through March 28th.

Faculty Spotlight #6 February 13th

The Brown Center invites you to our first Faculty Spotlight of the spring semester on Thursday, February 13th at 1:00 PM in the Carlton Union Building’s Lee Garage. The spotlights series is a showcase of research, creative inquiry, and other scholarly engagement of the campus community. Stop by and learn about the research of our talented Stetson community!

Details about the time and place can be found on Stetson’s Event Calendar

We have changed the format this year and will be having two sessions for thirty minutes each.

The two professors participating in this spotlight are:

Dr. Michael Eskenazi Assistant Professor of Psychology,

Department of Psychology

Visual and Lexical Processing in the Parafovea

Readers process information most efficiently in central vision (fovea centralis) where densely packed cone cells allow for high acuity visual processing.  However, outside of the fovea centralis (parafovea), vision is less clear.  Competing theories of word (lexical) processing during reading disagree about how much lexical information can be extracted from parafoveal vision.  This experiment investigated whether spelling (orthographic) and meaning (semantic) information could be extracted from parafoveal vision.  Results indicate that readers of all skill levels are able to extract both orthographic and semantic information from the parafovea.  Results are most consistent with a serial processing account of lexical processing.

Dr. Michael Eskenazi is the department’s specialist in cognitive psychology, which focuses on the mental processes of attention, language, memory, and perception. His specific area of research is in the process by which we identify and learn words during reading. He uses eye-tracking methodology to study readers’ eye movement behavior down to the millisecond, which is a reflection of their language processes. This research is conducted in the Reading Eye-Tracking and Individual Differences Lab (REAiD Lab).

Dr. Eskenazi regularly works with undergraduate students both in and out of the classroom. In his classes, students learn about cognitive processes, conduct and design experiments, and analyze data. He also mentors students each semester in his lab as they assist with his research and design their own studies. Students interested in working with Dr. Eskenazi should email or meet with him to discuss working in the REAiD Lab.


Dr. Roslyn Crowder – Assistant Professor of Biology

Department of Biology

Examining the anticancer properties of yaupon holly
In this spotlight presentation, Dr. Crowder will highlight her research examining the anticancer properties of yaupon holly. Yaupon holly is a shrub native to the southeastern portion of the United States. Anticancer properties of yaupon holly are largely unexplored. Alcohol extracts were prepared from both yaupon holly new and old leaves. Human leukemia Jurkat cells were treated with new and old leaf extracts and assessed for changes in metabolic activity and initiation of cell death. Dr. Crowder will discuss her research findings characterizing cell death revealed in human leukemia cells treated with yaupon holly extracts.

Dr. Roslyn N. Crowder, Associate Professor of Biology and Molecular Biology Program Coordinator, joined the Stetson faculty in 2013. Dr. Crowder earned her B.S. from Florida A&M University and her Ph.D. from the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Before coming to Stetson, she was a PENN-PORT teaching postdoctoral fellow at the University of Pennsylvania and research postdoctoral fellow at Penn State Cancer Institute.

Dr. Crowder is a molecular cancer biologist. Her research examines cell death pathways and regulation of cell death in human normal and cancer cells. Dr. Crowder and colleagues (Dr. Lynn Kee, Dr. Heather Evans-Anderson and Dr. Holley Lynch) were recently awarded a NSF grant to acquire an inverted fluorescent microscope. Dr. Crowder is currently using the newly acquired microscope to investigate abnormal protein localization of a cell death protein needed to activate programmed cell death in cancer cells.

Her undergraduate research program at Stetson investigates anticancer properties of plants. Her students have previously studied the cytotoxicity of human leukemia cells treated with extracts prepared from shell ginger Alpinia zerumbet and yaupon holly (Ilex vomitoria).

2020 Faculty Resource Network

Stetson University has been connected with New York University, and this partnership has allowed our faculty to participate in world-class seminars. NYU offers many different opportunities for college faculty all over the world, from seminars to scholar-in-residence programs. Here is a list of all the upcoming deadlines and programs through NYU:

Summer Scholar-in-residence

The Summer Scholar-in-Residence program allows Network faculty to come to New York University during the month of June to engage in research, develop curricula, and/or produce manuscripts for publication. The program allows Scholars to explore new dimensions in their disciplines, to engage in intellectual exchange and investigate resources not available to them at their home institutions, to broaden their own pedagogical expertise, to enrich existing courses or create new ones, and to expand professional contacts. Participation in the SIR program not only enhances the faculty members’ knowledge and skills, but also significantly contributes to the intellectual environment of their home institutions as they share what they learn with their colleagues and students.

Please fill out this packet by February 14th and email it to browncenter@stetson.edu

Network Summer 2020

If you are interested, applicants should submit the completed application along with their institutional liaison officer’s signature; a statement of intent that indicates how the seminar participant will apply what is learned at the home institution; a current CV; and a letter of support from either the division dean or department head, who is well-acquainted with the applicant’s area of research. This application should be submitted to browncenter@stetson.edu by February 14th.

For this summer, from June 8th to June 12th, the following seminars will be offered:

Bridging Pedagogy and Technology to Support Effective Learning
Creative Economy and Entrepreneurship in the Arts
Dramatizing History: Storytelling in the 21stCentury
Emotions Across Cultures
Fostering Mental Health and Wellbeing on University Campuses
Learning to Write Competitive Grant Proposals
Propaganda and Mass Persuasion Past and Present
The Craft of College Teaching
The 21st-Century Latin American City: Crisis and Alternatives
When the World Laughs: International Perspectives on Film Comedy
Fall 2020/ Spring 2021 Scholar-in-residence

The Semester Scholar-in-Residence program allows Network faculty who are either on leave or sabbatical from their home institution to come to New York University to engage in research, develop curricula, and/or produce manuscripts for publication during the Fall or Spring semester. The program allows Scholars to explore new dimensions in their disciplines, to engage in intellectual exchange and investigate resources not available to them at their home institutions, to broaden their own pedagogical expertise, to enrich existing courses or create new ones, and to expand professional contacts. Participation in the SIR program not only enhances the faculty member’s knowledge and skills, but also significantly contributes to the intellectual environment of their home institutions as they share what they learn with their colleagues and students.

If you are interested in Fall 2020, please fill out this application, as well as a letter of support from a dean/department chair and an up-to-date CV and digitally submit it to browncenter@stetson.edu by February 14th, 2020. 

If you are interested in Spring 2021,  please fill out this application, as well as a letter of support from a dean/department chair, and an up-to-date CV and digitally submit to the browncenter@stetson.edu by September 21st 2020

2020 National Symposium

This National Symposium presents faculty the opportunity to discuss and discover new curriculum innovations, and how to help students learn and ensure their success after graduation. This event is taking place in New Orleans this year from November 20th – 21st.  For more information on the National Symposium and what your proposal should look like, check the 2020 Symposium link above!

Abstracts and necessary supporting documents are due to the Brown Center by April 13th, 2020.