Faculty Spotlight #6 February 13th

The Brown Center invites you to our first Faculty Spotlight of the spring semester on Thursday, February 13th at 1:00 PM in the Carlton Union Building’s Lee Garage. The spotlights series is a showcase of research, creative inquiry, and other scholarly engagement of the campus community. Stop by and learn about the research of our talented Stetson community!

Details about the time and place can be found on Stetson’s Event Calendar

We have changed the format this year and will be having two sessions for thirty minutes each.

The two professors participating in this spotlight are:

Dr. Michael Eskenazi Assistant Professor of Psychology,

Department of Psychology

Visual and Lexical Processing in the Parafovea

Readers process information most efficiently in central vision (fovea centralis) where densely packed cone cells allow for high acuity visual processing.  However, outside of the fovea centralis (parafovea), vision is less clear.  Competing theories of word (lexical) processing during reading disagree about how much lexical information can be extracted from parafoveal vision.  This experiment investigated whether spelling (orthographic) and meaning (semantic) information could be extracted from parafoveal vision.  Results indicate that readers of all skill levels are able to extract both orthographic and semantic information from the parafovea.  Results are most consistent with a serial processing account of lexical processing.

Dr. Michael Eskenazi is the department’s specialist in cognitive psychology, which focuses on the mental processes of attention, language, memory, and perception. His specific area of research is in the process by which we identify and learn words during reading. He uses eye-tracking methodology to study readers’ eye movement behavior down to the millisecond, which is a reflection of their language processes. This research is conducted in the Reading Eye-Tracking and Individual Differences Lab (REAiD Lab).

Dr. Eskenazi regularly works with undergraduate students both in and out of the classroom. In his classes, students learn about cognitive processes, conduct and design experiments, and analyze data. He also mentors students each semester in his lab as they assist with his research and design their own studies. Students interested in working with Dr. Eskenazi should email or meet with him to discuss working in the REAiD Lab.


Dr. Roslyn Crowder – Assistant Professor of Biology

Department of Biology

Examining the anticancer properties of yaupon holly
In this spotlight presentation, Dr. Crowder will highlight her research examining the anticancer properties of yaupon holly. Yaupon holly is a shrub native to the southeastern portion of the United States. Anticancer properties of yaupon holly are largely unexplored. Alcohol extracts were prepared from both yaupon holly new and old leaves. Human leukemia Jurkat cells were treated with new and old leaf extracts and assessed for changes in metabolic activity and initiation of cell death. Dr. Crowder will discuss her research findings characterizing cell death revealed in human leukemia cells treated with yaupon holly extracts.

Dr. Roslyn N. Crowder, Associate Professor of Biology and Molecular Biology Program Coordinator, joined the Stetson faculty in 2013. Dr. Crowder earned her B.S. from Florida A&M University and her Ph.D. from the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Before coming to Stetson, she was a PENN-PORT teaching postdoctoral fellow at the University of Pennsylvania and research postdoctoral fellow at Penn State Cancer Institute.

Dr. Crowder is a molecular cancer biologist. Her research examines cell death pathways and regulation of cell death in human normal and cancer cells. Dr. Crowder and colleagues (Dr. Lynn Kee, Dr. Heather Evans-Anderson and Dr. Holley Lynch) were recently awarded a NSF grant to acquire an inverted fluorescent microscope. Dr. Crowder is currently using the newly acquired microscope to investigate abnormal protein localization of a cell death protein needed to activate programmed cell death in cancer cells.

Her undergraduate research program at Stetson investigates anticancer properties of plants. Her students have previously studied the cytotoxicity of human leukemia cells treated with extracts prepared from shell ginger Alpinia zerumbet and yaupon holly (Ilex vomitoria).

2020 Faculty Resource Network

Stetson University has been connected with New York University, and this partnership has allowed our faculty to participate in world-class seminars. NYU offers many different opportunities for college faculty all over the world, from seminars to scholar-in-residence programs. Here is a list of all the upcoming deadlines and programs through NYU:

Summer Scholar-in-residence

The Summer Scholar-in-Residence program allows Network faculty to come to New York University during the month of June to engage in research, develop curricula, and/or produce manuscripts for publication. The program allows Scholars to explore new dimensions in their disciplines, to engage in intellectual exchange and investigate resources not available to them at their home institutions, to broaden their own pedagogical expertise, to enrich existing courses or create new ones, and to expand professional contacts. Participation in the SIR program not only enhances the faculty members’ knowledge and skills, but also significantly contributes to the intellectual environment of their home institutions as they share what they learn with their colleagues and students.

Please fill out this packet by February 14th and email it to browncenter@stetson.edu

Network Summer 2020

If you are interested, applicants should submit the completed application along with their institutional liaison officer’s signature; a statement of intent that indicates how the seminar participant will apply what is learned at the home institution; a current CV; and a letter of support from either the division dean or department head, who is well-acquainted with the applicant’s area of research. This application should be submitted to browncenter@stetson.edu by February 14th.

For this summer, from June 8th to June 12th, the following seminars will be offered:

Bridging Pedagogy and Technology to Support Effective Learning
Creative Economy and Entrepreneurship in the Arts
Dramatizing History: Storytelling in the 21stCentury
Emotions Across Cultures
Fostering Mental Health and Wellbeing on University Campuses
Learning to Write Competitive Grant Proposals
Propaganda and Mass Persuasion Past and Present
The Craft of College Teaching
The 21st-Century Latin American City: Crisis and Alternatives
When the World Laughs: International Perspectives on Film Comedy
Fall 2020/ Spring 2021 Scholar-in-residence

The Semester Scholar-in-Residence program allows Network faculty who are either on leave or sabbatical from their home institution to come to New York University to engage in research, develop curricula, and/or produce manuscripts for publication during the Fall or Spring semester. The program allows Scholars to explore new dimensions in their disciplines, to engage in intellectual exchange and investigate resources not available to them at their home institutions, to broaden their own pedagogical expertise, to enrich existing courses or create new ones, and to expand professional contacts. Participation in the SIR program not only enhances the faculty member’s knowledge and skills, but also significantly contributes to the intellectual environment of their home institutions as they share what they learn with their colleagues and students.

If you are interested in Fall 2020, please fill out this application, as well as a letter of support from a dean/department chair and an up-to-date CV and digitally submit it to browncenter@stetson.edu by February 14th, 2020. 

If you are interested in Spring 2021,  please fill out this application, as well as a letter of support from a dean/department chair, and an up-to-date CV and digitally submit to the browncenter@stetson.edu by September 21st 2020

2020 National Symposium

This National Symposium presents faculty the opportunity to discuss and discover new curriculum innovations, and how to help students learn and ensure their success after graduation. This event is taking place in New Orleans this year from November 20th – 21st.  For more information on the National Symposium and what your proposal should look like, check the 2020 Symposium link above!

Abstracts and necessary supporting documents are due to the Brown Center by April 13th, 2020.

Faculty Spotlight #5 January 30th

The Brown Center invites you to our first Faculty Spotlight of the spring semester on Thursday, January 30th at 4:00 PM in the Carlton Union Building’s Stetson Room. The spotlights series is a showcase of research, creative inquiry, and other scholarly engagement of the campus community. Stop by and learn about the research of our talented Stetson community!

Details about the time and place can be found on Stetson’s Event Calendar

We have changed the format this year and will be having two sessions for thirty minutes each.

The two professors participating in this spotlight are:

Dr. Diane Everett Professor of Sociology,

Department of Sociology and Anthropolgy

“New Cocking” as a Gendered Process of Correctional Officers’ Welcoming of New Peers 

This presentation examines one facet of correctional officers’ (COs’) workplace inclusion. Specifically, it explores how gender, a prison’s custody grade (based on level of security risk), and workplace culture influenced how veteran COs informally welcomed new ones upon entry to their new workplace through the mild hazing ritual of “new cocking.” Based on in-depth, semi-structured qualitative interviews with 27 COs at a higher-custody men’s prison and at a lower-custody men’s prison, I discuss how COs viewed new cocking and how and why COs’ involvement in new cocking differed between female and male COs, the prisons’ custody levels, and their workplace cultures. In the process, I describe the gendered nature and outcomes of new cocking as a means of welcoming COs at men’s prisons. In general, the study’s findings reinforce those of previous studies about the nature of CO as a male-dominated occupation and men’s prisons as masculinized organizations. The additional findings that a prison’s custody grade and its workplace culture affect new officers’ welcoming underscores the need to analyze the factors that can heighten or attenuate the masculinized aspects of COs’ work in men’s prisons.   

Dr. Diane D. Everett, Professor of Sociology, earned her B.A. from Millsaps College and her M.A. and Ph.D. from Duke University.  Since joining Stetson University, she has served in numerous leadership roles, including Associate Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, co-chair of the Council of Undergraduate Associate Deans, co-chair of Provost Search Committee, Chair of the Faculty Senate, Interim Chair of the Department of Integrative Health Science (now, Health Sciences), Director of the Stetson Institute for Social Research, and Chair of the Tenure and Promotion Review Task Force.  She is currently serving as the Chair of the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, the Provost Faculty Fellow for Academic Advising, and the Coordinator of the Social Science major.  

Diane’s areas of specialization include gender, work, higher education, and applied social research.  She enjoys mentoring undergraduates and has co-presented professional presentations and co-authored articles with students, as well as with faculty and staff colleagues.  Her philosophy of undergraduate education is reflected in one of her favorite quotations: “Education is not making a living; it’s making a life.”


Dr. Chris Jimenez – Assistant Professor of English

Department of English

Homoglyphs, Letter Shapes, and the Cultural Politics of Character Encoding Standards

In this spotlight talk, Dr. Jimenez describes and theorizes the features of what is known as a “homoglyph,” a character whose literal or figural shape is nearly identical to and/or easily mistaken for another. Homoglyphs occupy a unique place between the visual representation of scripts and the digital encoding of data—namely, while computers do not “see” homoglyphs yet can identify them easily, humans experience almost entirely the opposite and confuse them for one another. Dr. Jimenez thus explores in this talk the question of when a glyph counts as a glyph (or even as itself), structuring the discussion by examining a recent clash between China and Japan over the representation of Chinese characters and what historical variants should be included in the international standard.

Dr. Chris D. Jimenez is Assistant Professor of English at Stetson. His research examines the discourse of catastrophe in 20th- and 21st-century global Anglophone literature, with interdisciplinary interests in ecocriticism, nuclear criticism, and biopolitics. His main book project, The Exploding Globe, argues that engaging with real and imagined catastrophe has allowed contemporary authors to expand the scale of literature beyond national boundaries to produce a distinctly global aesthetics. To this end and aided by a Penfield Research Fellowship in 2015, Dr. Jimenez traveled to Japan to study nuclear disaster and its global literary representations in Hiroshima, Nagasaki, and Fukushima. Dr. Jimenez also has an abiding interest in the digital humanities and has worked on numerous DH projects, and was the Andrew W. Mellon Price Lab Doctoral Fellow in the Digital Humanities at the University of Pennsylvania from 2016-2017, contributing to the Price Lab’s Mellon Seminars and DH project incubation. These experiences have helped informed Dr. Jimenez’s second book project, A Literary History of Unicode.

 

Brown Center Events Update

Spotlight

The Brown Center invites you to our first Faculty Spotlight of the spring semester on Thursday, January 30th at 4:00 PM in the Carlton Union Building’s Stetson Room. The spotlights series is a showcase of research, creative inquiry, and other scholarly engagement of the campus community. Stop by and learn about the research of our talented Stetson community!

The two professors participating in this spotlight are:

Dr. Diane Everett Professor of Sociology,

Department of Sociology and Anthropolgy

Dr. Chris Jimenez – Assistant Professor of English

Department of English


Inquiry Circles

The Brown Center is opening a second application round of Inquiry Circles for the Spring 2020 semester to support continued conversations about high-impact practices after Teaching & Learning Day. Each Inquiry Circle can receive up to $500 to pay for materials like books or even food for your meetings. Your only commitment is to meet at least 3 times and submit a brief impact report at the end of the term. The online application is active now at the following link: https://bit.ly/2tFXXK9


FAR Workshops

Faculty Annual Reviews are coming up, and the Brown Center wants to help you as much as possible. We are hosting a FAR Circle, which provides a comfortable space to for faculty to review and gain feedback from peers. The interim director of the Brown Center, Dr. Nathan Wolek, will also be in attendance to provide his experience with the FAR as both a faculty member and a department chair during his time at Stetson University. This event will be taking place Friday, January 31st from 12pm – 2pm. We will be providing lunch from Subway (6 inch sub and chips of your choice) and as such, we ask that you RSVP by Wednesday, January 29th by 12pm using this link.

FAR Writing Circle 2020

The Faculty Annual Review is coming up and the Brown Center would like to help you. We are offering a workshop that provides you with an overview of what the FAR is, as well as an opportunity to receive peer feedback. Interim Director of the Brown Center, Dr. Nathan Wolek, will be in attendance to provide his experience with the FAR as both a faculty member and a department chair.

This will be taking place on Friday, January 31st in the Lawrence Room (second floor Elizabeth) from 12pm to 2pm. Since we will be providing lunch, we ask that you fill out this RSVP by Wednesday, January 29th at 12pm.

National Conference for College Women Student LEaders (NCWSL) and Tech Trek: AAUW’s Commitment to Developing Women in LEadership

Stetson students Makeba Dorival, Kelli Kline, Emma Knowles and Taylor Hibel will be the guest speakers at our next gathering on January 14. Their topic is the “National Conference for College Women Student Leaders (NCWSL) and Tech Trek: AAUW’s Commitment to Developing Women in Leadership.” Cultural credit is available. 

The program begins at 11:30 in the Stetson Room, and we hope you can join us. It’s a terrific opportunity to learn about the great work AAUW does from Stetson women who have experienced and benefitted from it.  

Lunch is optional and will follow the program and general meeting.  Kindly RSVP for lunch by Friday morning, January 10 by sending an email to Maria Francis (mfranci1@stetson.edu), or call at 386.822.8950.  The cost of the luncheon is $14, which can be paid by cash or check at the event.

The American Association of University Women (AAUW) opens doors for women and girls, influences public debate on critical social issues, sponsors community programs, publishes groundbreaking research on women and girls, and is one of the world’s largest sources of funding exclusively for graduate women. All genders from all industries are welcome!

Teaching and Learning Day 2020

Teaching and Learning Day will be on January 10th from 8:30 a.m.- 1:00 p.m. in the CUB. Please mark your calendars and plan to join us at this annual gathering of Stetson faculty and staff.

RSVP for the event here

Our focus this year will be high-impact practices, and to do that we are trying a different format. We have many faculty and staff at Stetson who are already making innovative use of high-impact practices to improve student learning. So instead of a guest speaker, we decided to showcase some of these people in a way that will encourage sharing ideas and having conversations across programs and departments.

The day will be structured into workshop blocks led by members of the Stetson community on themes such as global learning, writing-intensive courses, community-engaged learning, internships, and learning communities. The schedule will allow everyone to attend multiple workshops and hopefully jumpstart some new conversations about the ways we employ high-impact practices at Stetson.

All members of the Stetson faculty and staff are invited to attend. The morning starts with breakfast available at 8:30 a.m. and concludes with a lunch served at 12:30 p.m.

We look forward to seeing you there!!!!

FACULTY SPOTLIGHT #4 November 21st

The Brown Center invites you to our Faculty Spotlight on Thursday, November 21st at 4:00 PM in the Carlton Union Building’s Stetson Room. The spotlights series is a bimonthly showcase of research, creative inquiry, and other scholarly engagement of the campus community. Stop by and learn about the research of our talented Stetson community!

Details about the time and place can be found on Stetson’s Event Calendar

We have changed the format this year and will be having two sessions for thirty minutes each.

The two professors participating in our fourth spotlight are:

Dr. Isabel Botero- Assistant Professor of Family Enterprise and Entrepreneurship

Family Enterprise Center

The Family Business Brand Effect: When non-family firms use family language as part of their brand

Family business brands encompass formal and informal communication of the family elements of firm essence (i.e., the family’s involvement in a firm) and which lead to associations and expectations in the mind of stakeholders that help differentiate these firms from others in the marketplace. Family business brands help leverage a unique value proposition in the marketplace, which often translates into family firms being perceived as more trustworthy than non-family firms. Giving the importance that customer perceptions are in today’s marketplace, some organizations try to use family language as part of their brands to try to generate positive perceptions in consumer’s minds. This project explored whether using family language generated positive perceptions in the mind of consumers independent of whether the firm was family owned or not.

Isabel C. Botero, Ph.D., is an educator, researcher and consultant in the areas of management and family enterprise. She obtained her Ph.D. from Michigan State University. Her areas of specialty include strategic communication processes, communication in and about family enterprises, influence processes in organizations and next-generation issues in family enterprises. Isabel has presented numerous papers in National and international Conferences (i.e., Academy of Management, Family Enterprise Research Academy, International Family Enterprise Research Academy). She has over 40 publications in international journals and books. Some of her publications have appeared in Family Business Review, Journal of Family Business Strategy, Journal of Family Business Management, Journal of Management Studies, and Management Communication Quarterly. She is a Fellow for the Family Firm Institute and board member for the International Family Enterprise Research Academy (IFERA Inc.).

Dr. Paul Sibbald – Associate Professor of Chemistry

Department of Chemistry

Using Computational Methods to Study Complex Chemical Processes 

The growth of state-of-the-art computational technologies has given researchers the tools for efficient elucidation of mechanisms and factors that control the reactivity and selectivity in complex synthetic organic reactions.  This project uses computational techniques to study the mechanism of two newly developed reactions from collaborators at Portland State University and Dartmouth College.  The mechanistic understanding gained in these two studies resulted in robust models that both explained the observed selectivity and were used to predict pathways of future reactivity.

Paul A. Sibbald, Ph.D., earned his B.S. in chemistry and B.A. in history from Alma College in Alma, MI.  He earned his Ph.D. in Chemistry under the guidance of Dr. Forrest Michael at the University of Washington with a focus on organometallic chemistry, reaction development, and mechanistic study.  After a postdoc at the University of Minnesota’s Center for Drug Design, Paul began his independent career at Stetson University in 2012.  At Stetson, Paul found the perfect match between his passions for science education and chemistry research.  His research interests include new reaction development, mechanistic study using both computational and traditional methods, and chemical pedagogy.  In his spare time, Paul loves to spend time with his family, play darts, bowl, and cook.  

Hollis Institute planning grant

The Nina B. Hollis Institute for Education Reform has an all call out right now for a grant that will provide funding to faculty members on the campus creating a proposal for their impact grants.

This $1000 grant will provide a faculty member with the resources to work on their proposal for the Nina B. Hollis Impact Grant.

All of the information for this is grant and the impact grant itself is available on their web page. For any other information or questions, you may contact Colleen Cooper at cmcooper@stetson.edu

Recap: 2019 Colloquium ON TEACHING AND LEARNING

Collaborations: Building Inclusive Bridges

April 5, 2019 – 8 AM – 5 PM
Stetson University, DeLand, FL
Lynn Business Center
(corner of N. Woodland Blvd and Michigan Ave [MapIt])

On Friday, April 5th, 2019 the Brown Center for Faculty Innovation and Excellence hosted the 5th annual Colloquium on Teaching and Learning Innovation.  This all-day event boasted a variety of engaging and thought-provoking sessions aligned with the theme of Building Inclusive Bridges.  Please share your feedback so we can improve your experience next year.

DOWNLOAD PROGRAM


Welcome

by
Noel Painter, Executive Vice President and Provost
Stetson University


Keynote: Building Bridges and Forging Learning Communities in Carceral Spaces

by
Pamela Cappas-Toro, Co-Director– Strategic Planning

Andy Eisen, Co-Director– Program Coordinator,
Melinda Hall, Co-Director– Curriculum
Jelena Petrovic, Co-Director– Faculty and Student Liaison,

Stetson University

The Community Engagement Project (CEP) is Stetson University’s liberal arts higher education in prison initiative. It was established in January 2015 by Stetson Faculty members and is currently co-directed by Drs. Pamela Cappas-Toro, Andy Eisen, Melinda Hall, and Jelena Petrovic. In this address, CEP co-directors, incarcerated students, and student interns will describe their efforts to create a diverse learning community inside and outside of the Tomoka Correctional Institution. 


Concurrent Session A (10:30am-11:45am)

A1- Contemplative Practices in the Classroom

Morris Sullivan, Stetson University

A2- Putting Taboo on the Table

Zach Cordell, Daytona State College

A3- Bridges to Global Citizenship Through Place-Based Education, Community Engagement, and Project-Based Learning

Savannah-Jane Griffin & Roxanne Lewis, Stetson University



Concurrent Session B (1:00pm-1:50pm)

B1- Scholarly Writing: Carving Time from a Hectic Schedule

Debbi Dinkind, Jennifer Corbin, Grace Kaletski-Maisel, & Kelly Larson, Stetson University

and

B1- Internationalizing the Stetson Writing Center: Collaborating Across Campus

Leigh Ann Dunning, Jeanette Jakupca, Aiyanna Maciel, & Amber Biron, Stetson University


B2- Creativity vs. Technology: The Battle for Student Engagement

Lenore Brantley, Advent Health University & Paul Brantley, North American Division Seventh-day Adventist Church

and

B2- Using a Video Spectrum for Student Support in Online Delivery

Marino Nader, University of Central Florida


B3- Telling Other People’s Stories: Reflections on Responsibly Teaching Multicultural Content as White Faculty

Sarah Cramer, Sam Houston, & Andy Eisen, Stetson University



Concurrent Session C (2:00pm-2:50pm)

C1- Collaboration Across Campuses: Research Symposia as a Way to Connect

Janis Prince- Saint Leo University


C2- Do I Really Need to Learn That? Bridging the Gap Between Curricular and Co-curricular Activities

Veon Stewart, Nadia Edwin, & Patricia Clayton, AdventHealth University

and

C2- Greater as a Whole: Bridging the Gap Between Community and Classroom

Kendra Presley-Van Houten, Veon Stewart, & Nadia Edwin, AdventHealth University


C3- Illegal and Legal Privilege in College Admission

Susan Peppers-Bates, Joanne Harris-Duff, Joel Bauman, Jeff Altier, & Savannah-Jane Griffin, Stetson University



Concurrent Session D (3:00pm-3:50pm)

D1- Reflections on Deep Reading: Teaching Reading in the College Classroom

Megan O’Neill, Michelle Randall, Cathy Day, Andy Denhart, & Fran Duvall, Stetson Univeristy


D2- Active Learning Strategies for Teaching and Learning Engineering Courses and What Students Think About Them

Ricardo Zaurin, University of Central Florida

and

D2- Utilizing the Gradula Release of Responsibility Teaching Model to Engage in a Large Enrollment Chemistry Course

Nicole Lapeyrouse & Cherie Yestrebsky, University of Central Florida


D3- Using Standardized Patients to Train Allied Health Students

Shirish Lala, Melanie McDonough, & Samantha Stern, Daytona State College

and

D3- Stetson University Parkinson’s Disease Support Group Initiative

Kirk Roberson (Stetson University), Vince Kinsler (Parkinson Association of Greater Daytona Beach), Colleen Vanderlip (Stetson University), & Matthew Schrager (Stetson University)



Closing Reception (4:00pm-5:00pm)

Breathe the Machine

Studio Circle D takes over Davis Lab (106) for an interactive installation event. Participants will move from screen to screen, using human breath to move and change what happens on the labs’ computers and in a larger collaborative story set in a near future.


Thank you to all who participated!  Be sure to  share your feedback so we can improve your experience next year.