Tag Archives: inclusive excellence

Call For Presentations: National Conference on Race and Ethnicity (NCORE)

Proposal deadline is December 4th, 2017

The 31st Annual National Conference on Race and Ethnicity (NCORE) will be held in New Orleans, May 29-Jun 2.  NCORE invites proposals that address important ongoing and emerging racial, ethnic and sovereignty social justice issues pertaining to our institutional communities in the U.S. System of Higher Education. Suggested areas of emphasis which are listed below. 

  • Discuss efforts to create inclusive higher education environments, programs, and curriculum; improve campus racial and ethnic relations; and/or expand opportunities for educational access and success by culturally diverse, traditionally underrepresented populations. These efforts may be specific or comprehensive in scope and either at a stage of development or be fully operational, developed, and advanced.
  • Provide important insights, points-of-view, skills, tools, and strategies that stress action, solutions, implementation, and practical applications.
  • Highlight exemplary actions, programs, approaches, and models.
  • Facilitate constructive dialogue, interaction, understanding and action around significant issues or within/between significant conference constituencies, i.e., racial/ethnic groups, students, faculty, affirmative action officers, student life personnel or other occupational classifications, early and/or advanced professionals, various geographical regions, and different types of higher education institutions

[Click here for submission guidelines]

New Issue of Liberal Education on Creating Inclusive Classrooms

Summer/Fall2017Vol.103No.3/4

Creating Inclusive Classrooms: Perspectives from Faculty Development

This issue explores the role of faculty development in creating educational spaces that welcome students of all identities and encourage dialogue across perspectives. Also included are articles on intersectionality and liberal education, racial divides in the contemporary United States, student engagement in the 2016 election, cocurricular arts programming, and the public narrative about teaching and learning. We

Tia Brown McNair to visit Stetson University

Becoming a Student-Ready College:

Are colleges and universities prepared for the students who are entering their institutions?

Dr. Tia Brown McNair

January 12, 2018 – 9 am – Noon
(Lunch immediately following)
duPont-Ball Library

Space is limited, RSVP to save your spot!

Tia Brown McNair will engage the Stetson University community in a conversation raised in a recently published book she co-authored, Becoming a Student-Ready College*. The national conversation asking “Are students college-ready?” concentrates on numerous factors that are beyond higher education’s control. This book flips the college readiness conversation to provide a new perspective on creating institutional value and facilitating student success. Instead of focusing on student preparedness for college (or lack thereof), this book asks the more pragmatic question of what are colleges and universities doing to prepare for the students who are entering their institutions? What must change in an institution’s policies, practices, and culture in order to be student-ready?

Dr. Tia Brown McNair currently serves as Vice President in the Office of Diversity, Equity, and Student Success at the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U). Dr. McNair oversees both funded projects and AAC&U’s continuing programs on equity, inclusive excellence, high-impact educational practices, and student success, including AAC&U’s Network for Academic Renewal series of yearly working conferences. Read Dr. McNair’s complete bio on the AAC&U website.

You can learn more about the Brown Center for Faculty Innovation and Excellence offerings by following the Stetson Faculty blog. Please reach out to our office if we can assist you.

Warm Regards,

Lynn Monahan, Project Manager
Julia Metzker, Executive Director

Brown Center for Faculty Innovation and Excellence
Stetson University
browncenter
(386) 822-7930
blog.stetson.edu/faculty-engagement

*A limited number of copies of Becoming a Student-Ready College will be made available to participants who wish to participate in book circles. If you are interested in participating in or leading a book circle, please indicate your interest with your RSVP.

Tia Brown McNair to visit Stetson University for 2018 Teaching and Learning Day

Each year, the Brown Center for Faculty Innovation and Excellence hosts a national scholar to Stetson University for the annual Teaching and Learning Day (formerly known as Faculty Learning Community Day). This day of reflection and discussion provides an opportunity for the Stetson community to grapple with big issues that impact our work delivering high-impact educational experiences in the 21st century. We hope that you will join us as we engage in thought-provoking conversation about Becoming a Student Ready College!

2018 Teaching and Learning Day
Making Excellence Inclusive: Becoming a Student-Ready College
January 12, 2018 – 9:00 – 12:00 PM
(Lunch immediately following)
duPont-Ball Library
Space is limited, RSVP to save your spot!

Tia Brown McNair will engage the Stetson University community in a conversation raised in a recently published book she co-authored, Becoming a Student-Ready College . The national conversation asking “Are students college-ready?” concentrates on numerous factors that are beyond higher education’s control. This book flips the college readiness conversation to provide a new perspective on creating institutional value and facilitating student success. Instead of focusing on student preparedness for college (or lack thereof), this book asks the more pragmatic question of what are colleges and universities doing to prepare for the students who are entering their institutions? What must change in an institution’s policies, practices, and culture in order to be student-ready?

Dr. Tia Brown McNair currently serves as Vice President in the Office of Diversity, Equity, and Student Success at the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U). Dr. Tia Brown McNair oversees both funded projects and AAC&U’s continuing programs on equity, inclusive excellence, high-impact educational practices, and student success, including AAC&U’s Network for Academic Renewal series of yearly working conferences.
Read Dr. McNair’s complete bio on the AAC&U website.

You can learn more about the Brown Center for Faculty Innovation and Excellence offerings by following the Stetson Faculty blog. Please reach out to our office if we can assist you.

*A limited number of copies of Becoming a Student-Ready College will be made available to participants who wish to participate in book circles. If you are interested in participating in or leading a book circle, please indicate your interest with your RSVP.

Call for Proposals: 2018 Gender and Sexual Diversity Conference

Present at the 2018 Gender and Sexual Diversity Conference, March 23 – 25, 2018.

Submission Deadline EXTENDED: Wednesday, November 15, at midnight.

The 2018 Gender and Sexual Diversity Conference needs your expertise! Presenters enhance the conference by sharing meaningful content and fostering engaging conversations in presentations, poster sessions, panel discussions and roundtables.

SUBMIT A PROPOSAL

Third Annual Colloquium: A Focus on Project-Based Learning | Stetson Today

[This story was reprinted in its entirety from Stetson Today]

Stetson University’s third annual Colloquium on Teaching and Learning was filled with inspiring, innovative and thought-provoking discussions and engagement.

Hosted on April 7 and 8 by Stetson University’s Brown Center for Faculty Innovation and Excellence, the event delineated innovative approaches to address real-world and complex challenges in the higher education classroom.

Noel Painter

“The Colloquium allows each of us to expand the breadth and depth of learning and scholarship, and examine how we make connections at this institution for a broad scope of learning,” explained Stetson University’s Executive Vice President and Provost Noel Painter, Ph.D., in his opening remarks.

Day one of the event included interactive workshops, sharing sessions, a Brown Innovation Symposium and an experimental art reception.

This year’s keynote speaker was Richard Vaz, Ph.D., inaugural director of Worcester Polytechnic Institute’s Center for Project-Based Learning (PBL). He and his team travel the country to help other colleges and universities implement or improve Project-Based Learning on their campuses.

Richard Vaz

“We’re talking about taking our courses and pushing the framework of theoretical education, moving students past the knowledge-based economy and preparing them for a more innovation-based environment,” Vaz stated in his keynote address. “You’re not just evaluating the results but the process of that project as well. Because projects are real-world based, it brings about very effective and interesting collaboration among faculty members as well.”

COLLOQUIUM EXPANDS

New this year was the expansion of the Colloquium from its traditional one-day event to add an embedded workshop specific to Project-Based Learning on the second day.

Twenty-two participants from four higher educational institutions, including Daytona State College, Capital University and Florida Polytechnic University, in addition to Stetson University, spent their Saturday learning how to implement or better utilize Project-Based Learning for their students.

Leading a discussion on “Minding the Gap: Engaging Conversations and Difficult Dialogues” include (L to R) Sharmaine Jackson, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology and current Brown Innovation Fellow; Rajni Shankar-Brown, Ph.D., associate professor of education, Jessie Ball DuPont chair and current Brown Innovation Fellow; Shawnrece Campbell, Ph.D., associate professor of English; Susan Pepper-Bates, Ph.D., associate professor of philosophy. They shared struggles and methods for navigating difficult classroom discussions with non-judgement yet creating teachable, meaningful moments from which students may grow and expand their existing world views.

Leading a discussion on “Minding the Gap: Engaging Conversations and Difficult Dialogues” include (L to R) Sharmaine Jackson, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology and current Brown Innovation Fellow; Rajni Shankar-Brown, Ph.D., associate professor of education, Jessie Ball DuPont chair and current Brown Innovation Fellow; Shawnrece Campbell, Ph.D., associate professor of English; and Susan Pepper-Bates, Ph.D., associate professor of philosophy. They shared struggles and methods for navigating difficult classroom discussions with non-judgement yet creating teachable, meaningful moments from which students may grow and expand their existing world views.

Those attending from Stetson University included: Shawnrece Campbell, Daniel Vaughen, David DiQuattro, Michael Eskenazi, Rajni Shankar-Brown, Madison Creech, Shun Kiang, Sharmaine Jackson,  Heather Edwards, Nichole Porther and Savannah-Jane Griffin.

Michael Eskenazi

Michael Eskenazi, assistant professor of psychology and current Brown Innovation Fellow, said the embedded workshop was invaluable.

“This event has given me the opportunity to redesign a class that I have been teaching for six semesters. It’s a good class, but now it’s even better as it is more project-based. I plan to spend the first half of the semester on instruction, content and engagement, then the second half on the students doing a project,” he said.

PRAISE FOR THE BROWN CENTER

Executive director of the Brown Center for Faculty Innovation and Excellence, Julia Metzker, Ph.D., and longtime Stetson University Trustee, Cici (Cynthia) Brown, Hon. ’07, talk after the Colloquium keynote address on April 7. Brown along with her husband, J. Hyatt Brown, Hon. ’92, who also serves on the SU Board of Trustees, established the Brown Center for Faculty Innovation and Excellence in 2014.

Executive director of the Brown Center for Faculty Innovation and Excellence, Julia Metzker, Ph.D., and longtime Stetson University Trustee, Cici (Cynthia) Brown, Hon. ’07, talk after the Colloquium keynote address on April 7. Brown along with her husband, J. Hyatt Brown, Hon. ’92, who also serves on the SU Board of Trustees, established the Brown Center for Faculty Innovation and Excellence in 2014.

The Colloquium is a signature program of the Brown Center for Faculty Innovation and Excellence, which was established by a generous endowment from longstanding Stetson University Trustees J. Hyatt Brown, Hon. ’92, and his wife, Cici Brown, Hon. ’07. The purpose of the center is to ensure active and continuous support of Stetson Faculty as life-long leaders and innovators, and to assert Stetson as a national higher education leader by modeling the University’s distinct character of learning and teacher-scholar role for future faculty.

“The Brown Center is unbelievable. It is so important for faculty development,” Professor Eskenazi noted. “I have other faculty friends across the country who don’t have the support like I do through the Brown Center, and they are just in awe. This Center and the Colloquium provide concrete ways of offering better engagement with students.”

-Trish Wieland

COLLOQUIUM EXPERIENCE FEEDBACK

Tony Abbott

“The colloquium provided good examples of how project-based learning fosters skills important in nearly all disciplines. The potential for interdisciplinary collaboration is rich work through such pedagogy.”

J. Anthony “Tony” Abbott, Ph.D., professor of environmental science and studies; inaugural Provost Faculty Fellow for international learning.

 

Savannah-Jane Griffin

“Attending this Colloquium has provided me time to network with colleagues across the state and grapple with ways to provide better support through the Center for Community Engagement to faculty that are interested in implementing project-based learning into their courses, as well as enhance the First Year Seminar that I teach.”

Savannah-Jane Griffin, director of community engagement & inclusive excellence; 2017 Colloquium presenter; Embedded PBL workshop participant.

Sharmaine Jackson

“I found the colloquium a great place to exchange ideas and find a community of teacher-scholars-practitioners interested in facilitating direct links of what is learned in the classroom with what is happening in the world around them. I have benefitted significantly as a Brown Innovation Fellow as I have amassed a number of tools to be used in improving my teaching, engaging students both in and outside of the classroom, and in writing about pedagogy.”

Sharmaine Jackson, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology – 2016-2017 Brown Innovation Fellow, 2017 Colloquium presenter, Embedded workshop participant.

Michele Randall

“I was encouraged by the number of faculty from our university and other institutions nearby who came together to learn more about high impact practices and how we can best serve our students. One of the best events was the workshop at the end of the day on Friday. We wrote out a few goals and were given an accountability buddy. I’ve been to countless conferences where I’ve left with tons of new ideas, but without plans and actual deadlines, those ideas too easily got lost in the day to day work. Everyone in that session had more than one great idea with clear goals and deadlines before they left for the day.”

Michele Randall, M.F.A., Sullivan Visiting Lecturer in English – 2015-16 Brown Innovation Fellow, 2017 Colloquium presenter and Brown Innovation Fellow mentor.

[This story was reprinted in its entirety from Stetson Today]

Website Helps International Students Find Jobs

Lou Paris stood before 24 students in his International Business class at Stetson University, sprinkling real-life experiences with textbook theories.

Stetson Visiting Lecturer Lou Paris talks to students in his class in the Stetson School of Business Administration.

“It’s hard these days to distinguish between business and international business,” he said, drawing on his many years of living abroad, first as a child in his native Venezuela and later in Canada, the United States and Europe.

But while large businesses and corporations are becoming more inclusionary, he pointed out that distinct cultural differences still exist between countries that are reflected in the dress, food, music, attitudes and lifestyles of the people.

“Every country is ethnocentric to some degree. You hold your culture to be superior, no matter how large or small the country is,” he told a class that included students from China, Sweden and Germany, although most were Americans. “I challenge you to go outside your comfort zone.”

Paris, now a U.S. citizen, has practiced what he preaches as an entrepreneur and visiting lecturer in Stetson’s School of Business Administration, where he graduated in 2001 and received an M.B.A. in 2007.

In recent years, he developed a website, called Konkeros.com, that places international students in jobs with U.S. companies (Stetson University was the first implementer of this technology). He also heads an International Students Club at Stetson that usually meets once or twice a month to discuss all aspects of living and working in America. Business leaders often are invited to speak to the group.

Now, Stetson has developed a plan to build on his efforts and provide more help for international students to start careers in a competitive global market.

Rosalie Richards, Ph.D., associate provost for Faculty Development at Stetson.

“Lou identified a demand by our international students and unselfishly volunteered his time and talent to this important work,” said Rosalie Richards, Ph.D., associate provost for Faculty Development. “As a result, he has inspired the University to formalize his efforts. We have developed a comprehensive plan to boost international student engagement, talent development, and career success and thus, provide an excellent return on investment for these students and their families.”

When Stetson’s plan is fully funded, she said, it will provide a full-time advocate who will continue to develop relationships with potential employers.

“The program will include internship support and the continued use of Konkeros.com will be a strong component. We also anticipate sharing what we learn because at Stetson, what’s good for international students is good for all students,” Richards added.

STUDENTS FROM 55 COUNTRIES
Last year, 185 undergraduate students at Stetson came from outside the United States, making up 6 percent of the student body. They were from 55 countries, according to Stetson’s Office of Institutional Research.

Paris said many of them major in International Business.

“They all know I was an international student,” he said. “Their questions can range from, ‘What do I do with a speeding ticket to I need a job to stay in the U.S.?’ ”

And that one question led to the idea of developing the website listing “tens of thousands” of employers, so foreign students could connect with companies that hire graduates with diverse cultural backgrounds.

“I asked the students what they needed to (find) a job. Their most common wish was to know what companies were hiring international students. So I didn’t waste time. I built a database,” he said. “I created something that no one else does by ranking companies by the best to least likely to hire students in the fields they majored in.”

Traditional job fairs were intimidating for some students, he said. One Venezuelan student broke down crying in Paris’ office, after she was unable to make even the most basic connection.

“I was very upset. She was so bright, but got no chance. I thought there was a need to help navigate the madness,” Paris said. “That was the catalyst for the site.”

SAVING STUDENTS TIME
Lucas Diniz, 24, graduated from Stetson last May with a degree in finance. Thanks to the Konkeros website and Paris, he quickly found a job at Product Quest Manufacturing in Daytona Beach. He’s a market research analyst working mainly on over-the-counter generic brands for stores like CVS.

“It saved time by narrowing down the companies that actually hire international students. When you just look for a job on your own, there can be a lot of wasted energy, where you go out on interviews only to hear they don’t hire international students,” Diniz said. “Lou (Paris) and Konkeros helped me select jobs where there was the most probability of getting hired.”

Paris said international students often feel like underdogs with no family or friends in the area to lean on for support. But on the flip side, that often builds character.

“They are tested more at a younger age in the ways of the world. They are more mature. They want to stay for the opportunities, or because their country is in shambles like in Venezuela, or they simply like the American way of life,” said Paris, whose father had owned a construction company in Venezuela when he was growing up.

Paris said he expects other colleges throughout the state and country in the near future to offer Konkeros as word spreads of its success.

“My goal is to get this in the hands of all international students in the United States. That would be incredible,” he said. “It’s the foundation for colleges to build upon. It can help them with admissions, attracting more international students by showing them that they can achieve their goals, and stay and work in the U.S.”

March 30, 2017 in Stetson Today

Inside Out

As Stetson University readies to open its doors to the 14th annual Florida Collegiate Pride Coalition Conference March 31-April 2, a core group of dedicated students continues to work for greater understanding and tolerance of sexual orientation among their peers and the larger community.

Medorie Petersen-Woodburn, chair of the FCPC conference student planning committee, is leading a handful of students to bring hundreds of people from Florida and across the Southeast to Stetson for the conference. With the theme, Inside Out, students hope to open a frank conversation about mental health, education and holistic wellness for the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer/questioning community.

In addition, with Stetson being the first private liberal arts institution to host the event, they are looking at the conference as an opportunity to showcase the university.

Medorie Petersen-Woodburn, chair of the FCPC conference student planning committee (left), meets with Stetson’s Lindsey Graves, assistant director of interfaith initiatives.

For one, organizers believe the Pulse nightclub shooting in June 2016 – an attack that targeted the LGBT community that left 49 dead – will play a prominent role in discussions.

“This conference is very important on Stetson campus because we have a very strong diversity inclusion initiative,” said Petersen-Woodburn, 20, a social science major. “You can’t be diverse and inclusive if you don’t have these conversations.”

The FCPC annual conferences began in 2003 as a way for the LGBTQ+ community to grow and network. Each year, the conference has been hosted at large universities across the state, including the University of Florida and the University of South Florida.

The three-day schedule is filled with events focused on helping mental health professionals better understand the issues that affect the LGBTQ+ community. The event features workshops about counseling on topics that include helping LGBTQ+ couples build biological families, substance abuse and a session titled, “What it is like to be trans and still be with your spouse.”

The keynote speaker is John Super, Ph.D., a University of Florida clinical assistant professor of counselor education who played a role in providing mental health counseling in the Orlando area in the days after the Pulse shooting. Pulse owner Barbara Poma is another speaker.

Conference attendees will watch Disney’s Inside Out, an animated film that puts faces and personalities to emotions. Other events include a vigil for Pulse victims.

Bek Luke, a double major in psychology and philosophy, has been working alongside Petersen-Woodburn to make sure the conference runs smoothly. His job is to sign up sponsors, help with volunteers, and communicate with speakers and entertainers. A senior, he said the conference is important to him as a transgender man because it underscores how the larger LGBT community cares.

“Being trans, I want to do as much for my community as I can,” he said.

According to Lamerial McRae, Ph.D., a member of the faculty (Brown Scholar Visiting Teacher-Scholar Fellow , Department of Counselor Education) and staff conference planning committee, the students involved in the planning are developing skills beyond classroom learning. At the same time, McRae added, Stetson is sending a signal to the larger community of acceptance and healing, especially in light of the Pulse attack.

“I don’t think anyone went unaffected by Pulse,” she said.

Students in McRae’s Multicultural Counseling class created posters and research that will be presented at the conference. One of those students, Payton Montague, a graduate student in the counseling program, said it’s important to reach out to the LGBT community on all levels. Montague and another student, Stacey Stanford, will be presenting their project, “Same-sex parenting: from the inside out.”

“All parents need help these days,” Montague said.

The conference, Petersen-Woodburn commented, is a way for the local LGBT community to reach out and show there is “a community of people who are similar to you but not the same.”

“Now more than ever, you can’t hide the fact that there’s homophobia and discrimination on all levels. And you can’t hide the fact that there is oppression on every level,” said Petersen-Woodburn.
“Especially after Pulse, there’s been this outcry of confusion, of hurt, but also this sense of how can I help? What can I do? What is my role in someone else’s life? How do I learn about people who are different from me and how can I help them? I think this conference is a way to get people who are hurt together to understand what it is to look at someone who might share one part of you but not every part.”

March 24, 2017 in Stetson Today

Immigration Forum at Stetson on April 1

There is a national debate underway on immigration and immigrant status in America, and much of it has been fueled by new executive orders and stepped up enforcement coming out of Washington, D.C.

Join Stetson University and Arturo R. Rios, of Rios Immigration Law Firm, a Stetson University College of Law alumnus and adjunct professor, in an open forum discussion on recent changes in immigration actions and law. This event is Saturday, April 1, 1-2 p.m., in the Marshall & Vera Lea Rinker Welcome Center. It is free and open to the public. Cultural Credit available.

Following the forum, Attorney Rios will hold free, 20-minute clinic sessions. There are only a very limited number of spots, so reserve a spot now or you can sign up at the forum if openings are still available.

Read the complete story on Stetson Today.