Tag Archives: teacher-scholar

Brown Fellow, Dr. Terence Farrell, featured in Stetson Today

No Squandered Sabbatical

[This story was reprinted in its entirety from Stetson Today

For Terence Farrell, Ph.D., a recent sabbatical provided an opportunity to finish some research projects and begin other new ones. The common theme: snakes. More specifically: rattlesnake predation on giant centipedes, the evolution of rattlesnake venom and the hormonal control of snake reproductive behaviors.

Dr. Terence Farrell holding a snake in the field.
A year of sabbatical research put Terence Farrell, Ph.D., on the front lines in search of all things serpentine.

Another theme for the professor of biology and Brown Faculty Fellow: collaboration with Stetson students and faculty.

“I keep an active research program, so I needed to get a lot of stuff done,” Farrell said of his sabbatical, which began in August 2017. “I mostly stayed on campus because a lot of the research was lab-based, but I also spent time at Lake Woodruff National Wildlife Refuge [DeLeon Springs, Florida] in the field.

“I worked with students to observe snake behaviors, so I needed to learn how to analyze and edit videos. I also started a YouTube channel and put videos on Facebook to gain a broader audience for the research.”

The National Geographic Society, for example, picked up some of the YouTube uploads.

Sabbaticals are offered to Stetson faculty once every seven years. The request for a sabbatical is reviewed by a committee, and professors have the option of either taking one semester or a full year working on their research projects. Farrell took the full year, and he also used the time to learn new skills that will help him in his research moving forward.

“Stetson stands out when it comes to encouraging faculty members and their research projects,” Farrell commented. “Research, including the amount and quality of research that occurs during sabbaticals, keeps faculty current in their fields and students engaged in the type of research that will serve them well moving forward in their careers.”

Since 1994, Farrell has published 23 journal peer-reviewed journal articles, five book chapters, two book reviews and five articles in the popular press. Many of Farrell’s papers have had multiple co-authors, and in 13 of them the lead author was an undergraduate or graduate student with little or no experience in scientific publishing.

Dr. Terence Farrell in the field with students
Students are frequently partners with their biology professor. “Collaboration with students is what Stetson is all about,” said Farrell.

Farrell seeks to always work closely with his students to guide them through every step of the complex task of getting a manuscript written, revised and published.

“Collaboration with students is what Stetson is all about,” he said. “Work both in the lab and in the field is critical to their development, and especially for seniors working on their research projects; it gives them something really cool to work on.”

Among the students this summer was Sam McPherson ’19, who majors in aquatic and marine biology.

“The research was multifaceted, so we were working on several questions at once, all using pygmy rattlesnakes as a model system for ecophysiology and behavioral ecology,” McPherson said. “Part of the work included my senior research project, in which I am determining the metabolic cost of pregnancy in pygmy rattlesnakes. This involved extensive time out in the field, and our main study site was Lake Woodruff National Wildlife Refuge. Field work included setting up enclosures for housing snakes — we call our site Pygmyopolis — spotting and capturing 27 pregnant female snakes as well as several nonreproductive females, comparing their metabolic rates in the lab using flow-through respirometry, and monitoring the field enclosures every day until the snakes gave birth. So, we could measure the mass of the neonates and the postpartum mass of the moms.”

Farrell has mentored approximately 100 students during their senior research projects. Fifteen of them were co-authors on published papers, and dozens of others have made poster or oral presentations at scientific meetings.

Notably, in other papers, co-authors are experts with special skills or equipment who exchange their services for authorship. Farrell is often the last listed co-author on papers, keeping with a tradition in the natural sciences of having the leader of a research lab appear at the end in the list of authors.

This deep engagement in research provided the students with a thorough understanding of the scientific process. In addition, dozens of other students not doing their senior research on snakes have made multiple trips to Lake Woodruff and other local natural areas to assist in the effort. More notable numbers: Eight of the students who completed their senior research project with Farrell continued to be deeply engaged in research after leaving Stetson and obtained doctorate degrees.

Not that all has been easy or without incident.

[Read the remainder of the article in the Fall 2018 issue of Stetson University Magazine.]

Call for Proposals: Brown Teacher-Scholar Fellowships

Do you have a project, initiative or area of study that could use a “boost” from a teacher-scholar fellow?  Would you like to bring some special expertise to campus?

The Brown Center for Faculty Innovation and Excellence is once again pleased to announce the Call for Proposals for the 2020-2022 Brown Teacher-Scholar Fellow!

To view proposal guidelines and submit a proposal, click here.

Brown Teacher-Scholar Fellow Call for Proposals

A few highlights …
  • Proposals are for two-year visiting assistant professorships
    (start date is Aug 15, 2020).
  • Proposals from interdisciplinary or issue-focused
    teams that span departments, colleges or schools are especially encouraged.
  • Dean and chair letters of support are required for ALL proposals.  Check with your dean’s office for procedures.
  • Budgets must be approved prior to submission.
  • The Brown Center will host proposal development workshops by request.

Critical Dates

01-Nov-18: Proposal Submissions open
15-Mar-19: Proposal submission deadline
15-May-19: Awards announced
01-Sep-19: Search committee convened
15-Aug-20: Contract start date

*The dates for recruitment and hiring may be adjusted to align with disciplinary and professional norms.

Program Timeline

Register now for 2018 Colloquium for Teaching and Learning Innovation

All Learners Welcome:
Making Excellence Inclusive

Friday, April 6, 2018
Stetson University, DeLand, FL

Rinker Auditorium – Lynn Business Center (LBC 108)
(corner of N. Woodland Blvd and Michigan Ave [MapIt]

The 4th annual Colloquium on Teaching & Learning Innovation  celebrates pedagogical strategies that support all learners. Excellence can be inclusive. However, this requires the academy to do the hard work of turning a critical eye on our own practices to recognize the assumptions we make and begin to decode our disciplinary strategies for the increasingly diverse talented class of learners (and educators) arriving at college each year.

REGISTRATION OPEN – REGISTER BY  MARCH 31, 2018Registration is free. However, participants are strongly encouraged to register to accommodate meal and seating requirements.

Join colleagues for a celebration of learning excellence. Share teaching and learning innovations, gains you have made in any area of learning, present new ideas, and more.

Questions? Contact browncenter@stetson.edu or 386-822-7930

REMINDER! Call for Proposals: Brown Teacher-Scholar Fellow Program

Do you have a project, initiative or area of study that could use a “boost” from a teacher-scholar fellow?  Would you like to bring some special expertise to campus?

The Brown Center for Faculty Innovation and Excellence is once again pleased to announce the Call for Proposals for the 2019-2021 Brown Teacher-Scholar Fellow!

<<Brown Teacher-Scholar Fellow Program >>

A few highlights …

  • Proposals are for 2-year visiting assistant professorships
    (start date is Aug 15, 2019)
  • Proposals from interdisciplinary or issue-focused
    teams that span departments, colleges or schools are especially encouraged
  • Dean and chair letters of support are required for ALL proposals
  • Budgets must be approved prior to submission
  • The Brown Center will host proposal development workshops by request.

CRITICAL DATES:

Nov 15, 2017:                       Call for proposals announced
Mar 15, 2018:                       Proposals deadline
Mar 15 – May 1, 2018 :   Proposal review period
May 15, 2018:                      Awards announced
Aug, 2018:                              Search committee convenes*
Oct, 2018 – Mar, 2019:  Candidate search*
Aug 15, 2019:                       Contract start date

Check with your Dean for internal deadlines

*The dates for recruitment and hiring may be adjusted to align with professional norms.

[proposal materials and guidelines]

Register now for 2018 Colloquium for Teaching and Learning Innovation

All Learner’s Welcome:
Making Excellence Inclusive

Friday, April 6, 2018
Stetson University, DeLand, FL

Rinker Auditorium – Lynn Business Center (LBC 108)
(corner of N. Woodland Blvd and Michigan Ave [MapIt]

The 4th annual Colloquium on Teaching & Learning Innovation  celebrates pedagogical strategies that support all learners. Excellence can be inclusive. However, this requires the academy to do the hard work of turning a critical eye on our own practices to recognize the assumptions we make and begin to decode our disciplinary strategies for the increasingly diverse talented class of learners (and educators) arriving at college each year.

REGISTRATION OPEN – REGISTER BY  MARCH 31, 2018Registration is free. However, participants are strongly encouraged to register to accommodate meal and seating requirements.
CALL FOR PROPOSALS
Submit your proposal by February 20th, 2018
..click here to submit your proposal..

 

Join colleagues for a celebration of learning excellence. Share teaching and learning innovations, gains you have made in any area of learning, present new ideas, and more.

Questions? Contact browncenter@stetson.edu or 386-822-7930

What Does it Mean to Be a Teacher-Scholar?

Here’s an excerpt from an essay, penned by Kenneth Ruscio during his recent presidency at William & Lee University. The essay was published in 2013 in Peer Review, the premier publication of Association of American Colleges & Universities, AAC&U.


Teaching introductory courses (and I mean really teaching them), conversing with colleagues outside your field on a regular basis, attending public lectures, meeting with visitors in different disciplines-all of that is bound to result in scholarship that is original and creative, genuinely interesting and imaginative. The teacher-scholar model in a liberal arts college is not an adaptation of the research-university approach to a constrained organizational setting. It is not Berkeley-lite. Instead it is a model with virtues all its own, pursued in a setting that affords advantages unavailable elsewhere.

The dash between teacher and scholar is meant to be a link, not a line of demarcation. Scholarship and creative endeavors enrich our teaching and are essential to instruction of the highest quality. Participation in scholarly communities keeps us current, connects us to wider worlds, and reminds the teacher of the learner’s experience: mastering new material; meeting with resistance or rebuffs; receiving and responding to criticism; and finding ways to communicate effectively to different groups.

Scholarly engagement usually produces published writings and professional presentations. A hallmark of the liberal arts college, however, is that conversation about new scholarship also takes place in our classrooms, in our offices, in our hallways, in our homes-anywhere that we exchange ideas with students. Scholarship sometimes grows directly out of relationships between students and faculty. Excellent students frequently serve as assistants in laboratories, colleagues in clinics, assistants in research projects, or collaborators in artistic performance.

Intellectual energy comes not only from faculty talking with able students but also from faculty talking with fellow faculty. Some of this activity is not clearly research or teaching, but it represents the spirit of creativity and curiosity that supports both. For instance, there is the English professor who audits colleagues’ psychology courses so that she can write about empathy in literature. There is the chemistry professor who studies art history so that he can better solve questions about the chemistry of art restoration. And there is the mathematics professor who learns biology in order to introduce science problems into calculus courses.

Though there are many ways in which teaching and scholarship are closely intertwined, there is also a tendency to separate the two activities and to emphasize scholarship over teaching in faculty evaluation. That comes because publications and professional activities are easily counted and measured by metrics that do not necessarily reveal the impact that they have in the classroom. At Washington and Lee, we try to avoid that temptation. We refuse to specify a number of articles, books, presentations or grants that constitute a threshold for success in scholarship. We try to make our standards for the review of academic performance flexible and fair-flexible, because we belong to different schools and different disciplines and apply criteria appropriate to different stages in our careers; fair, because reasonable colleagues across campus can witness and document the essential elements of progress as teacher-scholars.

Last chance to register for the 2017 Colloquium!

Join us on April 7th for the 3rd Annual Colloquium on Teaching & Learning Innovation!  Where else can you explore project-based learning, contemplative practices and engage with potential community partners?

Registration Deadline: March 31
Onsite registration available.

Download the Schedule-at-a-Glance

KEYNOTE

Project-based learning is an effective strategy for engaging students in authentic learning experiences that can develop a wide range of transferable skills and abilities.  Using Worcester Polytechnic Institute’s curriculum as a case study, I will describe how project-based learning can be used in and out of the major and across all four years of an undergraduate curriculum.   We will explore examples of projects on campus, in the local community, and around the globe.  I will present results from a study looking at the long-term impacts of project work on alumni, and will share some lessons learned from four decades of project-based education at WPI. 

Dr. Richard F. Vaz serves as the inaugural Director of Worcester Polytechnic Institute’s (WPI) Center for Project-Based Learning. The Center provides support to colleges and universities looking to implement or enhance project-based learning. In his prior role as dean of interdisciplinary and global studies, he had oversight of WPI’s interdisciplinary degree requirement, the Interactive Qualifying Project.

CONCURRENT SESSIONS

  • The Courage to Teach: Using a Faculty Learning Community to  Reframe the Role of the Professor
  • Inspire Change – Intervene!
  • Program Design for Outside Classroom Experiences
  • Diversifying Student Leadership
  • Project based learning using Raspberry Pi
  • Simulations, Technology and Flipped Classes: How Best to Engage?
  • Minding the Gap: Engaging Conversations and Difficult Dialogues
  • Transgressive Transformations : Explorations of Activist Education
  • How to Be a Productive Writer During the Semester
  • Integrating the best of both worlds: Problem based learning in a learner centered course
  • Global Collaboratory
  • How Much is Grade Inflation and How Much is More Effective Education?
  • Being present: contemplative practices to increase student learning and to keep you sane

Register now for the 2017 Colloquium for Teaching and Learning Innovation

Innovative Approaches to
Tackling Complex Challenges

April 7-8, 2017

The 3rd annual Colloquium on Teaching & Learning Innovation  addresses or responds to innovative approaches to tackling complex challenges. Join colleagues from across the nation for a celebration of learning excellence.

SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE

Submit your proposal by March 20th, 2017
Call for Proposals

Share teaching and learning innovations, gains you have made in any area of learning, present new ideas, and more.

As part of the Colloquium, the  Brown Center for Faculty Innovation and Excellence is thrilled to host a two-day project-based learning track as part of the Colloquium on Teaching and Learning Innovation. The workshop will be delivered by Dr. Rick Vaz and colleagues from the Center for Project-Based Learning at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI).

More

Colloquium Themes

  1. Integrative Learning and Signature Work
  2. Persistence, Retention, and Grit
  3. Teaching and Learning Innovations
  4. The Teacher-Scholar
  5. The Brown Innovation Symposium

Call for Proposals: Brown Teacher-Scholar Fellow Program

Do you have a project, initiative or area of study that could use a “boost” from a teacher-scholar fellow?  Would you like to bring some special expertise to campus?

The Brown Center for Faculty Innovation and Excellence is once again pleased to announce the Call for Proposals for the 2019-2021 Brown Teacher-Scholar Fellow!

To view proposal guidelines and submit a proposal, click here.

A few highlights …

  • Proposals are for two-year visiting assistant professorships
    (start date is Aug 15, 2019).
  • Proposals from interdisciplinary or issue-focused
    teams that span departments, colleges or schools are especially encouraged.
  • Dean and chair letters of support are required for ALL proposals.  Check with your dean’s office for procedures.
  • Budgets must be approved prior to submission.
  • The Brown Center will host proposal development workshops by request.

CRITICAL DATES:

15-Nov-17: Call For Proposals (submissions open)
15-Mar-18: Proposal submission deadline
15-May-18: Awards announced
01-Sep-18: Search committee convenes
15-Aug-19: Contract start date

*The dates for recruitment and hiring may be adjusted to align with professional norms.

Sarah Smiley-Walters joins Stetson as Brown Teacher-Scholar Fellow

Sarah Smiley-Walters started as the Brown Teacher-Scholar Fellow in Biology in January 2017. She recently completed her Ph.D. thesis which was titled “Interactions between Pigmy Rattlesnakes (Sistrurus miliarius) and a Suite of Prey Species: A Study of Prey Behavior and Variable Venom Toxicity.” At Stetson she is currently teaching comparative vertebrate anatomy and introductory biology. As a teacher-scholar, Dr. Smiley-Walters conducts collaborative research on snake ecology with Stetson undergraduates and with Terence Farrell, Brown Fellow and professor of biology. Dr. Smiley-Walters also has expertise in small mammal ecology and has served as an American Society of Mammalogists (ASM) – American Institute of Biological Science Public Policy Fellow in DC. She currently is the Chair of ASM’s Student Science Policy Award committee. Dr. Smiley-Walters has maintained an interest in pedagogy and, as a graduate student, served on a departmental curriculum committee and helped revise biology lab manuals. Sarah earned her Ph.D. from The Ohio State University, an M.S. from the University of South Florida, and dual B.S. degrees from Florida State University.